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The 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix, otherwise officially known as the XIII Grande Prêmio do Brasil was the opening round of the 1984 FIA Formula One World Championship, staged at the Jacarepaguá circuit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on the 25 March 1984.[1] The race would see Alain Prost inherit victory in the closing stages, while future rival Ayrton Senna made his World Championship debut.[1]

Indeed, Senna was one of a number of changes over the winter of 1983, joining Johnny Cecotto at an all new line-up for Toleman.[1] Elsewhere, Prost had joined McLaren, Renault hired Patrick Tambay and Derek Warwick, while Ferrari secured the signing of Michele Alboreto.[1]

Qualifying would see Elio de Angelis sweep to pole for Lotus-Renault, beating new Ferrari racer Alboreto by half a second.[1] Warwick, meanwhile, would put his new Renault into third ahead of Prost, while defending Champion Nelson Piquet would open his campaign in seventh.[1]

Poor starts from de Angelis and Prost, however, would shuffle the field the moment the lights went out, with Alboreto charging into the lead ahead of Warwick.[1] Nigel Mansell and Niki Lauda also got away well to complete the early top four, while Piquet's season got off to a miserable start as he limped away from the grid well after the rest of the field had charged clear.[1]

Alboreto and Warwick would soon inch away at the head of the field, with Lauda leading the chase once he had dealt with Mansell, while de Angelis continued to slip down the order in the #11 Lotus.[1] Prost, meanwhile, was in the ascendancy, and duly found himself back in the top four after moves on René Arnoux, de Angelis, and Tambay, the latter's tyres fading badly towards the end of his stint.[1]

Alborto's race was over on lap twelve after a brake failure pitched him into a spin, leaving Lauda in the lead from Warwick, Mansell and Prost.[1] The middle duo would soon find themselves behind the #7 McLaren as the pit stops loomed, although that was to change as a result of the stops.[1]

Indeed, Lauda's race would be ended by an electrical failure during his stop, a failure which also cost teammate Prost valuable time in the pits.[1] Mansell also had trouble, retiring soon after, while Arnoux had suffered a battery failure, leaving Warwick in the lead with Prost a distant second.[1]

Warwick would duly lead until the closing stages, when a suspension failure ended his race with ten laps to go, a legacy of early contact with Lauda.[1] Prost hence inherited the lead and would go on to win, while Keke Rosberg and de Angelis found themselves on the podium after a late retirement for Tambay.[1]

The race would also be noted for the result of Martin Brundle, who claimed a fifth place finish on his debut in the controversial Tyrrell 012.[1] Indeed, Brundle would be retroactively disqualified once the 012 was banned later in the season, meaning Thierry Boutsen claimed his maiden points finish.[1]

BackgroundEdit

The 1984 Formula One World Championship tour would kick-off in the heart of Brazil's second city, Rio de Janeiro and the Jacarepaguá circuit, returning for a fourth consecutive season.[2] The original plan had been to start the season at the Kyalami Circuit in South Africa, although with the circuit struggling to find a sponsor, FOCA and FISA both agreed to delay the South African Grand Prix for a few weeks.[3] As such, it was the Brazilian Grand Prix that opened the season on the 25 March, almost six months since the 1983 campaign had come to a close.[2]

Fuelling FreezeEdit

In terms of the rules for the 1984 season the FIA had banned re-fuelling during a Grand Prix after safety concerns throughout the previous two seasons.[2] Each car was now given an allocation of 220 litres (49.5 gallons) to cover a Grand Prix distance, meaning engines had to achieve more than four miles to the gallon.[2] This restriction was generally accepted without repute by both teams and manufacturers, and was part of a wider clarification on weight limits.[2]

Indeed, a drive to prevent teams illegally running underweight cars during the race had played a significant part in the ban on re-fuelling, with teams such as Brabham thought to be starting with an underweight car, and hence added weight via refuelling later in the race.[2] It was therefore theorised that teams would find new ways to attack the "spirit" of the rules, with suggestions of using ballast water tanks a popular rumour.[2] With no restrictions on replacing water during a pit stop it was certainly feasible that a team could add ballast to their cars mid-race.[2]

Brabham BrowbeatingEdit

Away from the rule changes and the late start to the season had allowed the majority of the field to enter new cars for the opening round, with a variety of changes throughout the field.[2] Indeed, defending World Champion Nelson Piquet would open his campaign with a new Brabham-BMW design, the BT53, which included various updates to the old BT52 such as a new alloy monocoque, larger sidepods, revised suspension geometry and carbon fibre panels.[2] Piquet would also get two new teammates, with the Fabi brothers Teo and Corrado sharing the #2 BT53 across the season, with the former getting the nod in Brazil.[2]

However, while the Brabham squad would start the season with Piquet as the official defending Champion, there were allegations that the British squad had cheated their way to the title in 1983.[3] These allegations concerned the special fuel developed by Wintershall specifically for the BT52, as well as what the squad were putting into the car during their pitstops.[3] Furthermore, when Brabham boss and FOCA president Bernie Ecclestone reportedly admitted to have cheated throughout 1983, unpopular FISA president Jean-Marie Balestre, previously the arch-nemesis of Ecclestone, waved away any suggestions of a retroactive disqualification, alienating the rest of the field.[3]

Racing RevisionsEdit

Regardless, there would be no further protests against the Brabham squad, with the rest of the field busying themselves with updating and/or replacing their equipment, and revising their driver line-ups.[3] Indeed, defending Constructors Champions Ferrari arrived in Brazil with new cars and a new driver line-up, with Michele Alboreto drafted in to partner René Arnoux in a pair of Harvey Poslethwaite and Mauro Forghieri designed 126C4s.[3] The new C4 was little more than an evolution of the Italian firm's 1983 car, sporting more carbon fibre, while Enzo Ferrari reportedly broke his own rule against signing an Italian driver to obtain Alboreto's services.[2]

Alboreto's switch to Ferrari had been required to fill the seat vacated by Patrick Tambay, who had left the Scuderia to join Renault.[2] It was all change after their dismal end to the 1983 season, with Renault sacking Alain Prost and dropping Eddie Cheever, replacing them with Tambay and the ever improving Derek Warwick.[2] Their new duo were equipped with a heavily redesigned car, the RE50, which featured revised aerodynamics, a composite monocoque and new suspension.[2]

Prost, meanwhile, would secure a seat at the revived McLaren squad, who had a new car, the MP4/2 as well as the latest generation of the TAG engine developed by Porsche.[2] The newest TAG engine was not the most powerful in the field, delivering only 750 bhp, but had superior fuel efficiency which combined well with the MP4/2's more simplified aerodynamic layout, and full carbon fibre monocoque.[2] Prost duly arrived in place of John Watson, who was one of a number of drivers associated with Brabham, while Niki Lauda continued with the team for another season.[2][3]

Senna 1983 Test

Ayrton Senna would test the Toleman-Hart TG183B at Jacarepaguá at the end of 1983.

Elsewhere, the young Toleman team would start with an all new line-up, with Warwick heading to Renault and Bruno Giacomelli stepping away.[2] They were subsequently replaced by Venezuelan motorcycle Champion Johnny Cecotto, as well as reigning British Formula 3 Championship Champion Ayrton Senna.[2] The two rookies were equipped with an updated version of the TG183B for the start of the season, with Hart continuing to supply the team with engines.[2]

Another team with an all new driver line-up were Tyrrell, who opted to field two debutantes for the season, namely Martin Brundle and Stefan Bellof.[2] They would be using the 012 design introduced in 1983, although they had the added bonus of being the primary Ford Cosworth engined team.[2] Unfortunately for them Ford and Cosworth refused to develop a turbocharged engine for F1, and so Tyrrell were given the latest evolution of the DFV V8, dubbed the "DFY" for the season, with another difficult season ahead.[2]

Indeed, only one other team would use the Cosworth engine at the start of the season, that being Arrows and their unchanged car, the A6.[2] They also had an unchanged driver line-up of Marc Surer and Thierry Boutsen, although they were known to have a BMW engined car in development to replace the A6.[2][3] Williams, meanwhile, were another team fielding an unchanged driver line-up, although Keke Rosberg and Jacques Laffite would use the same Honda engined FW09s introduced late in 1983 after losing faith in the old V8.[2]

Cosworth's former champions Lotus, meanwhile, would switch to Renault power for 1984, with Elio de Angelis and Nigel Mansell hoping turbo power would revive their fortunes after the ban on ground effect at the end of 1982.[2] Indeed, the new 95T saw various small improvements over its predecessor, the 94T, which had effectively served as a testbed for the new car at the end of 1983.[2] A new fuel tank, revised suspension geometry and Goodyear sourced tyres were the major changes, with the car running well at the pre-season test at Kyalami.[2][3]

Ligier had also abandoned Cosworth power ahead of the 1984 campaign, signing a deal with Renault as well as a new sponsor, Loto.[3] They also had a new design, the JS23, while they had also secured a new driver line-up in the form of Andrea de Cesaris and François Hesnault.[2] The new car itself was fairly up-to-date and on-par with its equivalents, sporting a carbon fibre monocoque and Ferrari style rear wing.[2]

Elsewhere the factory Alfa Romeo squad run by Euro Racing had lost their sponsorship from Marlboro, and so would instead run in the colours of Benetton, a sponsor poached from Tyrrell.[2] The team would also have two new faces at the wheel, with de Cesaris and Mauro Baldi replaced by Riccardo Patrese and Cheever, refugees from Brabham and Renault respectively.[2][3] Their new car, the 184T would use the incredibly inefficient turbo V8 built by Alfa, but would sport a carbon fibre monocoque.[2]

Baldi, meanwhile, would secure a seat at Spirit Racing for new season, with the British squad switching to Hart engines after losing their development contract with Honda.[2] RAM were also using Hart engines for 1984, fielding a new line-up in Philippe Alliot and Jonathan Palmer, while the team also introduced a new car, the 02.[2] Completing the field would be the lone ATS entered for Manfred Winkelhock using a BMW engine, as well as the now Alfa powered Osella for Piercarlo Ghinzani.[2]

Entry ListEdit

The full entry list for the 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix is shown below:

No. Driver Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
1 Brazil Nelson Piquet United Kingdom MRD International Brabham BT53 BMW M12/13 1.5 L4t M
2 Italy Teo Fabi United Kingdom MRD International Brabham BT53 BMW M12/13 1.5 L4t M
3 United Kingdom Martin Brundle United Kingdom Tyrrell Racing Organisation Tyrrell 012 Ford Cosworth DFY 3.0 V8 G
4 Germany Stefan Bellof United Kingdom Tyrrell Racing Organisation Tyrrell 012 Ford Cosworth DFY 3.0 V8 G
5 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams Grand Prix Engineering Williams FW09 Honda RA163E 1.5 V6t G
6 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams Grand Prix Engineering Williams FW09 Honda RA163E 1.5 V6t G
7 France Alain Prost United Kingdom Marlboro McLaren International McLaren MP4/2 TAG TTE PO1 1.5 V6t M
8 Austria Niki Lauda United Kingdom Marlboro McLaren International McLaren MP4/2 TAG TTE PO1 1.5 V6t M
9 France Philippe Alliot United Kingdom Skoal Bandit Formula 1 Team RAM 02 Hart 415T 1.5 L4t P
10 United Kingdom Jonathan Palmer United Kingdom Skoal Bandit Formula 1 Team RAM 02 Hart 415T 1.5 L4t P
11 Italy Elio de Angelis United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 95T Renault EF4B 1.5 V6t G
12 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 95T Renault EF4B 1.5 V6t G
14 West Germany Manfred Winkelhock West Germany Team ATS ATS D7 BMW M12/13 1.5 L4t P
15 France Patrick Tambay France Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE50 Renault EF4 1.5 V6t M
16 United Kingdom Derek Warwick France Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE50 Renault EF4 1.5 V6t M
17 Switzerland Marc Surer United Kingdom Barclay Nordica Arrows Arrows A6 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
18 Belgium Thierry Boutsen United Kingdom Barclay Nordica Arrows Arrows A6 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
19 Brazil Ayrton Senna United Kingdom Toleman Group Motorsport Toleman TG183B Hart 415T 1.5 L4t P
20 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto United Kingdom Toleman Group Motorsport Toleman TG183B Hart 415T 1.5 L4t P
21 Italy Mauro Baldi United Kingdom Spirit Racing Spirit 101B Hart 415T 1.5 L4t P
22 Italy Riccardo Patrese Italy Benetton Team Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 184T Alfa Romeo 890T 1.5 V8t G
23 United States Eddie Cheever Italy Benetton Team Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 184T Alfa Romeo 890T 1.5 V8t G
24 Italy Piercarlo Ghinzani Italy Osella Squadra Corse Osella FA1F Alfa Romeo 890T 1.5 V8t P
25 France François Hesnault France Ligier Loto Ligier JS23 Renault EF4 1.5 V6t M
26 Italy Andrea de Cesaris France Ligier Loto Ligier JS23 Renault EF4 1.5 V6t M
27 Italy Michele Alboreto Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C4 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6t G
28 France René Arnoux Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C4 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6t G
Source:[4]

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

Qualifying for the 1984 edition of the Brazilian Grand Prix would see the field get two days to qualify for the race, with the afternoons of Friday and Saturday dedicated to setting the grid.[2] Indeed, between those two sessions there would be three hours of running, while the mornings of each day would see drivers free to experiment with race setups, although most would, as ever, focus on outright pace.[2] As for a target time the recent turbo arms war had seen times steadily slip back towards those set with ground-effect cars, meaning Alain Prost's quali record of 1:28.808, set in 1982 was a realistic goal for the top teams.[2]

Friday QualifyingEdit

Indeed, those hoping to see Prost's old record fall were almost appeased during the Friday quali session, for Nigel Mansell would end the day with provisional pole having recorded a 1:29.394.[2] Indeed, the new Renault engined Lotus proved to be a forced to be reckoned with in the opening qualifying session of the season, with Elio de Angelis another strong runner, recording a 1:29.625.[2] The pair would run with different aero levels too, with de Angelis preferring higher downforce, while Mansell searched for top speed.[2]

Elsewhere, defending Champion, and Jacarepaguá specialist Nelson Piquet would throw away his best effort of the day, running onto the grass while on course to split the two Loti.[2] Michele Alboreto also looked strong in the new Ferrari, although it was Prost who ultimately got closest to the black-gold cars at the end of the day, claiming a 1:29.823.[2] Alboreto himself was next, just a thousandth ahead of Niki Lauda, while Patrick Tambay ended the session best of the rest as the first of those in the 1:30.000s.[2]

Indeed, both Tambay and Derek Warwick would struggle to find a good balance during the opening session with the new Renaults, although they seemed to be getting stronger throughout the day.[2] René Arnoux, meanwhile, was battling an intermittent fault on his engine that prevented him from challenging, while the two Alfa Romeos spent the session demolishing their engines and turbos.[2] Elsewhere there were already some murmurs of discontent among those using Pirelli tyres, which were struggling in the heat of the late Brazilian summer.[2]

Saturday QualifyingEdit

Saturday would again see Lotus emerge at the head of the field, with de Angelis fine tuning his aero-balance throughout the session.[2] That ultimately paid dividends, for the Italian ace duly smashed Prost's old record late in the day, recording a 1:28.392 to go over half a second clear of the rest of the field.[2] Mansell, meanwhile, would be denied the chance to respond as his engine was suffering from overheating, meaning he had to sit and watch as he slipped down the order.[2]

Indeed, before the end of the day Alboreto, Warwick and Prost would all slot in ahead of the #12 Lotus, with the former also the only man other than de Angelis to post a sub-1:29.000 time.[2] Warwick, meanwhile, would opt to use a higher downforce package that had been trialled by Renault in the pre-race test, and duly found that his RE50 could actually make it round a corner without understeering off.[2] Prost, meanwhile, was a content fourth after having a lap spoiled by Mansell, with the Frenchman getting something akin to revenge later on when the Brit suffered a huge spin when trying to dive in between the Frenchman's McLaren and Andrea de Cesaris.[2]

Senna 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix

It was Ayrton Senna who proved to be the best of the rookies in Brazil.

Elsewhere Williams were well off the pace, with Keke Rosberg battling horrendous understeer as a result of the FW09s updated rear-end.[2] He ended the session just ahead of Arnoux, who had to abandon his race car mid-session after a turbo failure, while Jacques Laffite in the second FW09 had trouble with his rev limiter.[2] Best of the rookies would be British F3 Champion Ayrton Senna, who wrestled his Toleman-Hart around almost two seconds faster than teammate Johnny Cecotto, while Martin Brundle and Stefan Bellof both made the grid.[2]

With only twenty-six grid slots on offer one driver was set to missout on a starting slot.[2] That man proved to be another inexperienced driver in the form of Jonathan Palmer, with the Brit two tenths off teammate Philippe Alliot, and almost ten off of de Angelis' pole winning time.[2] Yet, miraculously, Palmer would get to start the race, for Manfred Winkelhock would be disqualified after the session as a result of receiving a push-start during the session.[2] ATS boss Gunther Schmid was the ultimate cause of the exclusion, having made his unedited thoughts on the matter all too clear when the organisers were assessing whether to hand Winkelhock a penalty.[2]

Qualifying ResultsEdit

The full qualifying results for the 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time Gap
Q1 Q2
1 11 Italy Elio de Angelis United Kingdom Lotus-Renault 1:29.625 1:28.392
2 27 Italy Michele Alboreto Italy Ferrari 1:29.950 1:28.898 +0.506s
3 16 United Kingdom Derek Warwick France Renault 1:30.945 1:29.025 +0.633s
4 7 France Alain Prost United Kingdom McLaren-TAG 1:29.823 1:29.330 +0.938s
5 12 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell United Kingdom Lotus-Renault 1:29.394 1:30.182 +0.972s
6 8 Austria Niki Lauda United Kingdom McLaren-TAG 1:29.951 1:29.894 +1.462s
7 1 Brazil Nelson Piquet United Kingdom Brabham-BMW 1:31.068T 1:30.149 +1.757s
8 15 France Patrick Tambay France Renault 1:30.719 1:30.554 +2.162s
9 6 Finland Keke Rosberg United Kingdom Williams-Honda 1:31.778 1:30.611 +2.219s
10 28 France René Arnoux Italy Ferrari 1:30.832 1:30.695 +2.303s
11 22 Italy Riccardo Patrese Italy Alfa Romeo 1:30.973 1:31.679 +2.581s
12 23 United States Eddie Cheever Italy Alfa Romeo 1:33.115 1:31.282 +2.890s
13 5 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams-Honda 1:32.032 1:31.548 +3.156s
14 26 Italy Andrea de Cesaris France Ligier-Renault 1:34.622 1:32.895 +4.503s
15 2 Italy Teo Fabi United Kingdom Brabham-BMW 1:33.951 1:33.227 +4.835s
16 19 Brazil Ayrton Senna United Kingdom Toleman-Hart 1:36.867 1:33.525 +5.133s
17 20 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto United Kingdom Toleman-Hart 1:35.960 1:35.300 +6.908s
18 3 United Kingdom Martin Brundle United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 1:36.081 1:36.191 +7.689s
19 25 France François Hesnault France Ligier-Renault 1:36.257 1:36.238 +7.846s
20 18 Belgium Thierry Boutsen United Kingdom Arrows-Ford Cosworth 1:36.737 1:36.318 +7.920s
21 24 Italy Piercarlo Ghinzani Italy Osella-Alfa Romeo 1:40.431 1:36.438 +8.042s
22 4 Germany Stefan Bellof United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 1:36.967 1:36.609 +8.217s
23 21 Italy Mauro Baldi United Kingdom Spirit-Hart 1:36.816 1:39.873 +8.424s
24 17 Switzerland Marc Surer United Kingdom Arrows-Ford Cosworth 1:37.204 1:37.348 +8.812s
25 9 France Philippe Alliot United Kingdom RAM-Hart 1:38.124 1:37.709 +9.317s
DNQ* 10 United Kingdom Jonathan Palmer United Kingdom RAM-Hart 1:38.840 1:37.919 +9.527s
EXC 14 West Germany Manfred Winkelhock West Germany ATS-BMW 1:32.997
Source:[2][5]
  • T Indicates a driver used their test/spare car to set their best time in that session.
  • Bold indicates a driver's best/qualifying time.
  • * Palmer failed to qualify but was listed as first reserve.[2]
  • Winkelhock was excluded from the results of qualifying for receiving a push start.[2]

GridEdit

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 ______________ 1
2 Elio de Angelis
Michele Alboreto ______________
Row 2 ______________ 3
4 Derek Warwick
Alain Prost ______________
Row 3 ______________ 5
6 Nigel Mansell
Niki Lauda ______________
Row 4 ______________ 7
8 Nelson Piquet
Patrick Tambay ______________
Row 5 ______________ 9
10 Keke Rosberg
René Arnoux ______________
Row 6 ______________ 11
12 Riccardo Patrese
Eddie Cheever ______________
Row 7 ______________ 13
14 Jacques Laffite
Andrea de Cesaris* ______________
Row 8 ______________ 15
16 Teo Fabi
Ayrton Senna ______________
Row 9 ______________ 17
18 Johnny Cecotto
Martin Brundle ______________
Row 10 ______________ 19
20 François Hesnault
Thierry Boutsen ______________
Row 11 ______________ 21
22 Piercarlo Ghinzani
Stefan Bellof ______________
Row 12 ______________ 23
24 Mauro Baldi
Marc Surer ______________
Row 13 ______________ 25
26 Philippe Alliot
Jonathan Palmer ______________
  • * de Cesaris was unable to start the race from the grid due to an issue on the formation lap.[5]
  • Palmer was promoted onto the grid after Manfred Winkelhock was excluded from the results of qualifying after a push start.[2]

RaceEdit

Raceday proved to be another warm affair, with the ever oppressive heat of the Brazilian summer beating down on the Jacarepaguá circuit.[2] The warm-up would pass without issue, meaning the 25 qualifiers plus Jonathan Palmer would make their way to the grid to take the start.[2] Indeed, it seemed as if the 1984 World Championship tour would get underway in perfect fashion, only for a late issue to delay the start.[2]

ReportEdit

Just as the field prepared to take the start, Andrea de Cesaris would begin frantically waving, the gearbox in his Ligier seeming to have suddenly been fitted with a selection of neutrals.[2] The start was hence delayed for half an hour, with de Cesaris dragged to the pit lane and told to join the back of the grid.[2] He duly rejoined the field as they completed their second parade lap half an hour later, with one lap removed from the race distance.[2]

At the second time of asking the lights would go from red to green, although there would still be cars stranded on the grid.[2] Indeed, as Michele Alboreto charged past pole sitter Elio de Angelis to claim the lead, the home fans would be in uproar, for their hero Nelson Piquet had stalled.[2] Miraculously both the Brazilian World Champion, and Johnny Cecotto managed to avoid getting collected, although would both require a push-start to get underway.[2]

Mansell 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix

Nigel Mansell and Derek Warwick would scrap during the early stages of the race.

At the head of the field, meanwhile, de Angelis would quickly get elbowed down the field, with Derek Warwick, Nigel Mansell and Niki Lauda all making their way past.[2] Alboreto, meanwhile, would establish a small lead at the head of the field, and duly held it through to the end of the opening tour.[2] He was chased by Warwick, Mansell, Lauda and de Angelis, with Alain Prost another big loser during the opening lap.[2]

The early stages would follow much the same pattern, with Alboreto inching away out front, while Warwick slowly pulled away from Mansell.[2] Indeed, both Lotus-Renaults were struggling with the heat, for Mansell was powerless to avoid letting Lauda pass, while de Angelis slipped behind Patrick Tambay and Prost.[2] Elsewhere Piquet was slowly catching onto the back of the pack, while his compatriot Ayrton Senna saw his debut curtailed by a turbo failure.[2]

Lauda would be the man to watch over the following laps, for the Austrian would barge his way through to second on lap ten, clubbing the front left of Warwick's Renault as he went through.[2] Fortunately both would carry on without seemingly having an issues, with Lauda sprinting away to try and catch Alboreto.[2] Yet, before he could do so the #27 Ferrari would spin out of the lead at the end of lap twelve, a terminal brake caliper failure ensuring that Alboreto would retire soon after.[2]

With that the race would settle down, Lauda easing away from Warwick at the head of the field, while Prost charged through to third with moves on Tambay, de Angelis and Mansell.[2] Indeed, the field would remain stable until the pit window opened, with Warwick coming in at the end of lap 29 to swap his worn Michelins for a fresh set.[2] Yet, such was the pace of the lead trio that the Brit would only slip to third, and duly began to re-catch the two McLaren-TAGs ahead with his new tyres.[2]

Senna 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix. 2jpg

Ayrton Senna's debut would come to an early end, in spite of his spirited drive.

Indeed, when the two McLarens did eventually pit at the end of lap 38, Warwick was able to sweep into the lead before either completed their stops, although this was in-part due to an issue for Lauda.[2] Indeed, the Austrian ace would be forced to stop at the end of the lap after his electrics cut-out midway around the lap, meaning he limped in to retire just ahead of Prost.[2] Unfortunately for Prost his teammate would cost him valuable time in the pits as his car had to be pushed out of the way for the Frenchman's, with Prost screaming back into the race to hunt down Warwick.[2]

Once again the race would settle down, with various issues thinning the field during and after the pit stops.[2] Indeed, quick-fire failures saw Piquet, Mansell, Riccardo Patrese and de Cesaris all retire, before Warwick went out with ten laps to go.[2] Unfortunately for the Brit his collision with Lauda early on had weakened a wishbone on his front left, which would subsequently fail after forty laps of strain.[2]

Prost was hence left with a commanding lead at the head of the field, with just nine cars still circulating.[2] Tambay, meanwhile, would be the man to inherit second after the retirement rush, although his pace would fall dramatically in the closing laps as his Renault drained the last of its fuel.[3] That allowed the twitchy Williams of Keke Rosberg to close up in the final stages, which duly cruised into second with three laps to go to leave the Frenchman vulnerable to an improving de Angelis.[3]

Yet, there would be no more fighting for the rest of the afternoon, for de Angelis would lose engine power late on a drop back from the Finn, while Tambay rolled to a stop with two laps to go having run out of fuel.[2] That left Rosberg clear to follow Prost across the line, the Frenchman looking imperious in his new Mclaren as he won by over 40 seconds.[2] de Angelis would survive well to claim third ahead of Eddie Cheever, while the debuting Martin Brundle claimed fifth ahead of Tambay, Thierry Boutsen, Marc Surer and Palmer.[2]

Post-raceEdit

Immediately after the race Arrows boss Jackie Oliver submitted a complaint to the stewards, claiming that the Tyrrell of Brundle had been refuelled during its stop.[3] While that protest was rejected due to a lack of evidence, Oliver's claims were later proved correct at the 1984 Detroit Grand Prix, leading to Brundle and Tyrrell being retroactively disqualified from all 1984 Grand Prix.[1] Tambay was hence re-classified in fifth, while Oliver's driver Boutsen was promoted into sixth to claim his maiden points finish.[1]

ResultsEdit

The full results for the 1984 Brazilian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 7 France Alain Prost United Kingdom McLaren-TAG 61 1:42:34.492 4 9
2 6 Finland Keke Rosberg United Kingdom Williams-Honda 61 +40.514s 9 6
3 11 Italy Elio de Angelis United Kingdom Lotus-Renault 61 +59.128s 1 4
4 23 United States Eddie Cheever Italy Alfa Romeo 60 +1 lap 12 3
5* 15 France Patrick Tambay France Renault 59 Out of fuel 8 2
6 18 Belgium Thierry Boutsen United Kingdom Arrows-Ford Cosworth 59 +2 Laps 20 1
7 17 Switzerland Marc Surer United Kingdom Arrows-Ford Cosworth 59 +2 Laps 24
8 10 United Kingdom Jonathan Palmer United Kingdom RAM-Hart 58 +3 laps 26
DSQ 3 United Kingdom Martin Brundle United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 60 Disqualified 18
Ret 16 United Kingdom Derek Warwick France Renault 51 Suspension 3
Ret 26 Italy Andrea de Cesaris France Ligier-Renault 42 Gearbox 14
Ret 22 Italy Riccardo Patrese Italy Alfa Romeo 41 Gearbox 11
Ret 8 Austria Niki Lauda United Kingdom McLaren-TAG 38 Electrics 6
Ret 12 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell United Kingdom Lotus-Renault 35 Accident 5
Ret 1 Brazil Nelson Piquet United Kingdom Brabham-BMW 32 Engine 7
Ret 2 Italy Teo Fabi United Kingdom Brabham-BMW 32 Turbo 15
Ret 28 France René Arnoux Italy Ferrari 30 Battery 10
Ret 24 Italy Piercarlo Ghinzani Italy Osella-Alfa Romeo 28 Gearbox 21
Ret 25 France François Hesnault France Ligier-Renault 25 Overheating 19
Ret 9 France Philippe Alliot United Kingdom RAM-Hart 24 Battery 25
Ret 20 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto United Kingdom Toleman-Hart 18 Turbo 17
Ret 5 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams-Honda 15 Electrics 13
Ret 27 Italy Michele Alboreto Italy Ferrari 14 Brake 2
Ret 21 Italy Mauro Baldi United Kingdom Spirit-Hart 12 Distributor 23
DSQ 4 Germany Stefan Bellof United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 11 Throttle 22
Ret 19 Brazil Ayrton Senna United Kingdom Toleman-Hart 8 Turbo 16
EXC 14 Germany Manfred Winkelhock Germany ATS-BMW
Source:[6]
  • * Tambay was still classified despite retiring as he had completed 90% of the race distance.[6]
  • Brundle and Bellof were retroactively disqualified following the "ban" of the Tyrrell 012 after the 1984 Detroit Grand Prix.[6]
  • Winkelhock was excluded from qualifying after receiving a push-start.[6]

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

Unsurprisingly it was Alain Prost who led the Championship after the opening round, leaving Brazil with a three point lead. Keke Rosberg would start the season in second ahead of Elio de Angelis, with Eddie Cheever, Patrick Tambay and Thierry Boutsen collecting the remaining points.

The Manufacturers' Championship would see McLaren-TAG lead the chase after the opening battle, holding a three point lead over Williams-Honda. Lotus-Renault were next ahead of Alfa Romeo, with Renault and Arrows-Ford Cosworth the only other scorers.

World Championship for Drivers
Pos. Driver Pts. +/-
1 France Alain Prost 9
2 Finland Keke Rosberg 6
3 Italy Elio de Angelis 4
4 United States Eddie Cheever 3
5 France Patrick Tambay 2
6 Belgium Thierry Boutsen 1
World Championship for Manufacturers
Pos. Team Pts. +/-
1 United Kingdom McLaren-TAG 9
2 United Kingdom Williams-Honda 6
3 United Kingdom Lotus-Renault 4
4 Italy Alfa Romeo 3
5 France Renault 2
6 United Kingdom Arrows-Ford Cosworth 1

Only point scoring drivers and constructors are shown.

These standings have been modified to show the Championship as it stood after the retroactive disqualification of the Tyrrell 012 and drivers Martin Brundle and Stefan Bellof.

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 'Brazilian GP, 1984', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2014), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr389.html, (Accessed 29/01/2019)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 2.31 2.32 2.33 2.34 2.35 2.36 2.37 2.38 2.39 2.40 2.41 2.42 2.43 2.44 2.45 2.46 2.47 2.48 2.49 2.50 2.51 2.52 2.53 2.54 2.55 2.56 2.57 2.58 2.59 2.60 2.61 2.62 2.63 2.64 2.65 2.66 2.67 2.68 2.69 2.70 2.71 2.72 2.73 2.74 2.75 2.76 2.77 2.78 2.79 2.80 2.81 2.82 2.83 2.84 2.85 2.86 2.87 2.88 2.89 2.90 2.91 2.92 2.93 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 A.H., 'Brazilian Grand Prix', motorsportmagazine.com, (Motor Sport Magazine, 01/05/1984), https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/may-1984/82/brazilian-grand-prix, (Accessed 29/01/2019)
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 '1. Brazil 1984', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2014), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1984/bresil.aspx, (Accessed 29/01/2019)
  4. 'Brazil 1984: Entrants', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2015), https://www.statsf1.com/en/1984/bresil/engages.aspx, (Accessed 19/01/2019)
  5. 5.0 5.1 'Brazil 1984: Qualifications', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), https://www.statsf1.com/en/1984/bresil/qualification.aspx, (Accessed 04/01/2019)
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 'Brazil 1984: Result', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), https://www.statsf1.com/en/1984/bresil/classement.aspx, (Accessed 29/01/2019)
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 '1984 Brazilian GP', chicanef1.com, (Chicane F1, 2014), http://www.chicanef1.com/racetit.pl?year=1984&gp=Brazilian%20GP&r=1, (Accessed 29/01/2019)
V T E 1984 Formula One Season
Teams Brabham • Tyrrell • Williams • McLaren • RAM • Lotus • ATS • Renault • Arrows • Toleman • Spirit • Alfa Romeo • Osella • Ligier • Ferrari
Engines Alfa Romeo • BMW • Ferrari • Ford • Hart • Honda • Renault • TAG
Drivers Piquet • 2 T. Fabi • 2 C. Fabi • 2 Winkelhock • 3 Brundle • 3 Johansson • 4 Bellof • 4 Thackwell • 5 Laffite • 6 Rosberg • 7 Prost • 8 Lauda • 9 Alliot • 10 Palmer • 10 Thackwell • 11 De Angelis • 12 Mansell • 14 Winkelhock • 14/31 Berger • 15 Tambay • 16 Warwick • 33 Streiff • 17 Surer • 18 Boutsen • 19 Senna • 19/20 Johansson • 20 Cecotto • 20 Martini • 21 Baldi • 21 Rothengatter • 22 Patrese • 23 Cheever • 24 Ghinzani • 30 Gartner • 25 Hesnault • 26 De Cesaris • 27 Alboreto • 28 Arnoux
Cars McLaren MP4/2 • Ferrari 126C4 • Lotus 95T • Brabham BT53 • Renault RE50 • Williams FW09 • Toleman TG183B • Toleman TG184 • Alfa Romeo 184T • Ligier JS23 • Arrows A6 • Arrows A7 • Osella FA1F • Osella FA1E • ATS D7 • Spirit 101B • Spirit 101C • RAM 01 • RAM 02 • Tyrrell 012
Tyres Goodyear • Michelin • Pirelli
Races Brazil • South Africa • Belgium • San Marino • France • Monaco • Canada • Detroit • Dallas • Britain • Germany • Austria • Netherlands • Italy • Europe • Portugal
See also 1983 Formula One Season • 1985 Formula One Season • Category
V T E Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix
Circuits Interlagos (1972 - 1977, 1979 - 1980, 1990 - Present), Jacarepaguá (1978, 1981 - 1989)
Interlagos1990
Races 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 • 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 • 2018 • 2019
Non-Championship Race 1972
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