FANDOM


The 1977 Brazilian Grand Prix, otherwise known as the VI Grande Premio do Brasil, was the second round of the 1977 FIA Formula One World Championship, staged at the Autódromo do Interlagos on the 23 January, 1977.[1] The race would be remembered for a large number of accidents, as well as a strong recovery drive from defending Champion James Hunt.[1]

It had been a strong start to the weekend for the Brit, with Hunt claiming pole position from new Ferrari racer Carlos Reutemann.[1] Mario Andretti and Jochen Mass shared the second row, while home hero Carlos Pace would start from fifth in the Brabham-Alfa Romeo.[1]

It was the aforementioned Pace who made the best getaway from the grid, any suggestions of a jump-start waved away by the Brazilian officials.[1] Reutemann was the man to lead the chase, retaining second, while Hunt slipped to third ahead of McLaren teammate Mass.[1]

Unfortunately the track, bathed in intense heat since early morning, would begin to break up in the early stages, meaning Pace was unable to establish a safe lead.[1] This was made even more evident when Hunt barged his way past Reutemann for second, putting the Brit right onto the back of the Brabham-Alfa.[1]

Yet, Hunt would never get the chance to attack the Brazilian, for Pace ran wide while dodging a lump of tarmac, allowing Hunt to try a move on the Brazilian around the back of the circuit.[1] Pace duly swept back onto the circuit and smacked into the side of the McLaren, severely damaging his own suspension.[1] Pace therefore shot into the pits and out of contention, while Hunt continued on with barely a mark on his car.[1]

A rather bizarre accident would follow a few laps later, as Mass went spinning off the circuit and into some catch-fencing, which somehow managed to land onto the circuit.[1] Next on the scene were Clay Regazzoni and Ronnie Peterson, and both were powerless to avoid the tangled fencing.[1] They therefore joined Mass on the sidelines in a knotted mess of netting and broken bodywork at the side of the circuit.[1]

Back on track and Hunt was beginning to struggle with excessively worn tyres, so much so that Reutemann was able to catch and pass the Brit on lap 23.[1] That move prompted Hunt to stop for fresh tyres, allowing Niki Lauda, John Watson and Tom Pryce to pass.[1]

Hunt would spend the rest of the afternoon chasing down the trio, taking all three before Watson joined the pile of cars at the scene of Mass' earlier accident.[1] Other accidents claimed Vittorio Brambilla, Patrick Depailler, Jacques Laffite and Pace, the latter quartet all hitting cars left abandoned on the side of the circuit.[1] Pryce, meanwhile, would disappear in the closing stages with an engine failure.[1]

With that the race was run, Reutemann able to cruise home to claim victory for Ferrari, a few seconds clear of the charging Hunt in second.[1] Lauda also cruised home in third as the last man on the lead lap, with Emerson Fittipaldi avoided trouble to finish a strong fourth ahead of Gunnar Nilsson and Renzo Zorzi.[1] Ingo Hoffmann was the only other finisher, in a race which had seen fourteen retirements and numerous incidents.

BackgroundEdit

Two weeks after the season opening round in Argentina and the F1 circus arrived in Brazil for the annual battle around the Autódromo do Interlagos.[2] Indeed, the 1977 visit promised to be one of the best attended Grand Prix ever in South America, with no fewer than four Brazilian drivers in the field, two of whom were native to São Paulo.[2] In terms of the circuit there were no major changes to the layout, although some minor resurfacing had been required after a particularly brutal winter.[2]

Into the entry list and there were no changes to the field after the Argentine Grand Prix, although there had been some major work completed by several teams.[2] By far the busiest were Lotus, who had shipped Mario Andretti's car back over the Atlantic, rebuilt it, and got it to Brazil in pristine condition.[2] That meant that the American racer could join teammate Gunnar Nilsson for practice, with both hoping that their 78s would perform well on the sweeping Brazilian circuit.[2]

McLaren had been marginally less busy since the trip to Argentina, completing a forensic investigation of James Hunt's suspension failure in Buenos Aires.[2] Their investigation resulted in some reinforced parts for both Hunt and Jochen Mass' cars, although for Brazil the team only had time to modify the bolts within both sets of rear suspension.[2] The spare car had been left untouched owing to time, although neither Hunt nor Mass were expected to use it for the race.[2]

Elsewhere there were mutual panics for Shadow and Surtees, who were both told that the airliner they had used had lost one of their cars.[2] Fortunately the crates they were stored in were found, meaning both appeared in Brazil at full strength.[2] That meant that Tom Pryce and Renzo Zorzi were again partnered in the black Shadows, while Vittorio Brambilla and Hans Binder continued on for John Surtees' team.[2]

More paperwork drama would see the Wolf of Jody Scheckter mistakenly registered as a Brabham-Alfa Romeo, a fact which almost saw the Canadian creation shipped to Europe by mistake.[2] The reason for this mix-up was the fact that Carlos Pace's Brabham BT45 had been too badly damaged to be fixed in South America, and so had to be shipped back to Europe for a rebuild.[2] That was not the end of the issue, however, as Brabham designer Gordon Murray was unable to find the car upon its return, spending almost a week searching for the chassis before it was found safe in its crate at Rome Airport.[2]

Once located Pace's car was shipped to the U.K., rebuilt, and sent back across the Atlantic to join John Watson's car in Brazil.[2] The Brit would spend time on the beach along with a host of his fellows, while Pace spent his time training after being struck by heat exhaustion in Argentina.[2] Indeed, with the Brabham-Alfa looking to be among the strongest cars in the field, Pace felt the pressure to perform in front of his literal home crowd more than ever.[2]

On the topic of shipping issues, the lone BRM of Larry Perkins joined the fray in Brazil, the British squad having missed the season opener after their shipping crate proved too large to fit into a Boeing 707.[2] Their new creation, the P207 looked radically different to the rest of the field, with a delta shaped front wing and squared off bodywork encasing their home-made V12 engine.[2] The team had also secured a title sponsorship deal with the London based Rotary Watch company, although many doubted that the new car would revive the former Champions' fortunes.[2]

Elsewhere, Tyrrell were given a minor headache when a set of spare bodywork went missing, although those parts were found just before Ronnie Peterson and Patrick Depailler landed in Brazil.[2] Ferrari, in contrast, had no issues regarding their cars, meaning Niki Lauda and Carlos Reutemann would have no issues ahead of the race in Brazil.[2] Their ex-driver Clay Regazzoni, meanwhile, would again race in the Ensign, while Jacques Laaffite had the new Ligier-Matra at his disposal once again.[2]

Completing the field would be March with their pairing of Alex Ribeiro and Ian Scheckter, the former getting his first taste of racing in front of his home fans.[2] The two Fittipaldis also made it to their home race, with both Emerson Fittipaldi and Ingo Hoffmann's cars receiving full services to give both the best chance of impressing.[2] Those two rounded out a list of 22 entries for the Brazilian Grand Prix.

Into the early Championship standings and victory for Jody Scheckter in Argentina had ensured that he, unsurprisingly, led the World Championship hunt after the opening round, three ahead of Pace. Reutemann was a content third having secured his first points for Ferrari, with Fittipaldi equally happy with fourth for his home-made effort. Andretti and Regazzoni completed the early scorers list.

A maiden victory on their "debut" meant that it was Wolf-Ford Cosworth who led the International Cup for Constructors charge after the opening round, three ahead of Brabham-Alfa Romeo. Ferrari opened their title defence in third, while Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth were a record fourth after the opening round. Team Lotus-Ford Cosworth found themselves in fifth ahead of Ensign-Ford Cosworth, both hoping that this result was a sign of things to come.

Entry listEdit

The full entry list for the 1977 Brazilian Grand Prix is outlined below:

No. Driver Entreat Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
1 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom Marlboro Team McLaren McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
2 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom Marlboro Team McLaren McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
3 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell P34 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell P34 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
5 United States Mario Andretti United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 78 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
6 Sweden Gunnar Nilsson United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 78 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
7 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom Martini Racing Brabham BT45 Alfa Romeo 115-12 3.0 F12 G
8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Martini Racing Brabham BT45 Alfa Romeo 115-12 3.0 F12 G
9 Brazil Alex Ribeiro United Kingdom Hollywood March Racing March 761B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
10 South Africa Ian Scheckter United Kingdom Team Rothmans International March 761B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
11 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T2 Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 G
12 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T2 Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 G
14 Australia Larry Perkins United Kingdom Rotary Watches Stanley BRM BRM P207 BRM P202 3.0 V12 G
16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United Kingdom Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN8 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
17 Italy Renzo Zorzi United Kingdom Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN5B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
18 Austria Hans Binder United Kingdom Durex Team Surtees Surtees TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
19 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom Beta Team Surtees Surtees TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
20 South Africa Jody Scheckter Canada Walter Wolf Racing Wolf WR1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
22 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni United Kingdom Team Tissot Ensign with Castrol Ensign N177 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
26 France Jacques Laffite France Ligier Gitanes Ligier JS7 Matra MS73 3.0 V12 G
28 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Brazil Copersucar-Fittipaldi Fittipaldi FD04 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
29 Brazil Ingo Hoffmann Brazil Copersucar-Fittipaldi Fittipaldi FD04 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
Source:[3]

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

Practice/qualifying would return to the 1976 format in Brazil, with three "timed" sessions supported by an additional "untimed" period.[2] Friday would host two of the "timed" sessions, both held in dry conditions, while Saturday would host the final "timed" period in the morning ahead of the lone "untimed" session.[2] This gave the entire field three attempts to beat the target time, a 2:32.50 set by James Hunt en-route to pole in 1976.[2]

ReportEdit

The opening session of the weekend would be all about the fight to be the best British team, with McLaren, Lotus and Brabham all fighting to be top.[2] All three would exchange chart topping time throughout Friday morning, before Carlos Pace settled the issue in the final half hour with a 2:30.57.[2] Much of Pace's end of morning advantage came in the fact that the Alfa Romeo engined Brabham was 10 mph faster down the straights, leaving Jochen Mass, in second, almost a second behind.[2]

Elsewhere, Pace's teammate John Watson was struggling with an engine issue, leaving him out of the fight, while Andretti's partner Gunnar Nilsson was learning the circuit.[2] Ferrari, meanwhile, were being humbled by former driver Clay Regazzoni in the Ensign, the Swiss racer ending the first session three tenths clear of Carlos Reutemann.[2] The other Ferrari of Niki Lauda, meanwhile, was to be found well outside the top ten, the Austrian entering several heated conversations with designer Mauro Forghieri over the #11 car's wayward handling.[2]

Into the second session on Friday and it was Andretti who topped the times, albeit unable to best Pace's time from the morning with a 2:30.83.[2] The American was, like Pace, the only man to get into the 2:30.00s during the session, with the rest of the field, including the Brazilian in the 2:31.00s or slower.[2] Hunt therefore ended the session second fastest with a 2:31.29, half a second clear of Pace on 2:31.86.[2]

Away from the pinnacle and both of Tyrrells looked impressive, as long as the observer only saw them on the straights.[2] Indeed, both Patrick Depailler and Ronnie Peterson were struggling with horrendous understeer, prompting the latter to return to his old method of throttle based control.[2] Tom Pryce adopted a similar style in the Shadow, while Vittorio Brambilla pushed so hard that he ripped a radiator off his Surtees.[2]

Brambilla's teammate Hans Binder was less impressive, the inexperienced Austrian suffering a huge accident at the Curva do Sol, smashing into the barriers to write off his car.[2] Ian Scheckter was a few seconds behind the Austrian's accident, and duly managed to remove the nose of his March while avoiding the larger chunks of Surtees.[2] Binder himself was able to escape uninjured, but had to wait until Saturday morning to take over the delayed spare car.[2]

Saturday itself saw marginally cooler conditions for the morning session, meaning the field were able to get better performance out of their engines.[2] Ultimately, however, the fight for pole would be settled early on, with Hunt heading out early to record a session best of 2:30.11 to claim pole.[2] The Brit was given a late scare by Reutemann late in the session, who just fell shy of pole having had a new rear-wing fitted overnight, while Andretti improved to claim third, in spite of running with excess fuel due to a fuel feed issue.[2]

In contrast to his teammate's sudden improvement, Lauda would end the session in a lowly thirteenth, forced to swap to the "muletta" after his race car suffered a catastrophic fuel leak.[2] Jacques Laffite, meanwhile, did his best to burn through Ligier-Matras supply of engines, blowing up two in two days, while Jody Scheckter encountered his first issues with the new Wolf, keeping him down the order.[2] Finally, at the very back of the field there came the new BRM, with Larry Perkins unable to complete more than two laps in a row before the chunky car overheated.[2] Indeed, the Australian's best effort of 2:42.22, some twelve seconds off of Hunt's pole time, cause many to question whether the BRM should race at all.[2]

The "untimed" session on Saturday afternoon was a rather more eventful affair, Andretti's car spontaneously combusting at the hairpin due to a fuel leak.[2] Quick reactions from the American racer saw him leap out of the cockpit before the car came to a stop, with the Lotus 78 quickly coated in extinguishant by the marshals, while Andretti himself was left with a few burn marks on his race suit.[2] Teammate Nilsson stopped to pick up Andretti and get an explanation, with the Lotus crew getting the car back to the paddock to rebuild before the race.[2]

Qualifying ResultsEdit

The full qualifying results for the 1977 Brazilian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time Gap
Q1 Q2 Q3
1 1 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 2:31.64 2:31.29 2:30.11
2 12 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Italy Ferrari 2:31.97 2:32.50 2:30.18 +0.07s
3 5 United States Mario Andretti United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 2:32.21 2:30.83 2:30.35 +0.24s
4 2 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 2:31.50 2:32.68 2:30.36 +0.25s
5 8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Brabham-Alfa Romeo 2:30.57 2:31.86 2:30.82 +0.46s
6 4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 2:32.99 2:49.13 2:30.69 +0.58s
7 7 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom Brabham-Alfa Romeo 2:32.65 2:32.30 2:31.09 +0.98s
8 3 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 2:33.29 2:33.97 2:31.63 +1.52s
9 22 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 2:31.69 2:34.24 2:32.29 +1.58s
10 6 Sweden Gunnar Nilsson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 2:34.82 2:34.37 2:32.14 +2.03s
11 19 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom Surtees-Ford Cosworth 2:35.38 2:33.19 2:32.19 +2.08s
12 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United Kingdom Shadow-Ford Cosworth 2:34.32 2:34.54 2:32.22 +2.11s
13 11 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Ferrari 2:33.75 2:32.37 2:33.48T +2.26s
14 26 France Jacques Laffite France Ligier-Matra 2:38.21 2:32.43 +2.32s
15 20 South Africa Jody Scheckter Canada Wolf-Ford Cosworth 2:32.81 2:33.24 2:33.32 +2.70s
16 28 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 2:32.94 2:33.13 2:32.98 +2.83s
17 10 South Africa Ian Scheckter United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 2:37.89 2:36.86 2:33.46 +3.35s
18 17 Italy Renzo Zorzi United Kingdom Shadow-Ford Cosworth 2:38.60 2:36.22 2:34.62 +4.51s
19 29 Brazil Ingo Hoffmann Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 2:39.00 2:38.04 2:35.57 +5.46s
20 18 Austria Hans Binder United Kingdom Surtees-Ford Cosworth 2:36.81 2:35.79 2:36.42T +5.68s
21 9 Brazil Alex Ribeiro United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 2:36.70 2:37.55 2:36.19 +6.08s
22 14 Australia Larry Perkins United Kingdom BRM 2:53.24 2:48.01 2:42.22 +12.11s
Source:[2][4]
  • Bold indicates a driver's best/qualifying time.
  • T Indicates a test/spare car.

GridEdit

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 1 ______________
James Hunt 2
______________ Carlos Reutemann
Row 2 3 ______________
Mario Andretti 4
______________ Jochen Mass
Row 3 5 ______________
Carlos Pace 6
______________ Patrick Depailler
Row 4 7 ______________
John Watson 8
______________ Ronnie Peterson
Row 5 9 ______________
Clay Regazzoni 10
______________ Gunnar Nilsson
Row 6 11 ______________
Vittorio Brambilla 12
______________ Tom Pryce
Row 7 13 ______________
Niki Lauda 14
______________ Jacques Laffite
Row 8 15 ______________
Jody Scheckter 16
______________ Emerson Fittipaldi
Row 9 17 ______________
Ian Scheckter 18
______________ Renzo Zorzi
Row 10 19 ______________
Ingo Hoffmann 20
______________ Hans Binder
Row 11 21 ______________
Alex Ribeiro 22
______________ Larry Perkins

RaceEdit

Raceday proved to be the warmest part of the weekend, with the start time set for 12:00pm local time.[2] The pre-race warm-up passed without issue, with Lotus miraculously managing to completely rebuild Mario Andretti's car before the early morning session.[2] The American was therefore able to join the other twenty-one starters on the grid, who would all leap into action as the starters' lights flashed to green on the stroke of midday.[2]

ReportEdit

Virtually everyone's starts would be overshadowed by that of Carlos Pace, the Brazilian reacting suspiciously quickly to the lights to jet to the head of the field.[2] Indeed, so impressive was his start that most of the fans forgot to note that it was actually the Brazilian's former teammate Carlos Reutemann who scythed into the first corner with the lead.[2] In truth, Reutemann's lead was but a side note, with Pace slicing past the Ferrari into the banked turn three a few seconds later.[2]

Come the end of the opening tour Pace had established a healthy lead out front, a couple of seconds clear of Reutemann in second.[2] James Hunt was next ahead of his teammate Jochen Mass, while Andretti was harassing them along with Clay Regazzoni.[2] A small gap preceded the next group led by Patrick Depailler while, unsurprisingly, the BRM of Larry Perkins quietly retired at the end of the lap having overheated. Again.[2]

The early stages of the race would see Pace continue to eek out his lead, although his escape was aided by the fact that Reutemann was having to resist intense pressure from Hunt.[2] The Brit would ultimately elbow his way through during the third lap and duly cruised onto the back of Pace, but was alarmed to see the Brabham-Alfa Romeo simply pull away down the straights.[2] The McLaren was clearly superior in the corners, however, and so Hunt was more than happy to simply harass Pace for the time being.[2]

That left Reutemann to defend from Hunt's teammate Mass, although the German himself was on the defensive from Andretti, whose Lotus was darting around in his mirrors.[2] Regazzoni stuck with them the entire time, hoping to slip past the drivers ahead if and when a move was made.[2] Elsewhere, Gunnar Nilsson had to pit for a puncture, Vittorio Brambilla stopped to have a radiator repaired having struck another kerb, while Ian Scheckter was out with an oil starved gearbox.[2]

There would be a brief, driver instigated pause to the action as a small grass fire started at the side of the final corner, causing smoke to spill across the circuit until it was put out.[2] Once that was out the fight for the lead resumed, with Hunt getting close enough to worry Pace at the end of the second straight, causing the Brazilian to run wide into turn three.[2] Running wide caused Pace to run into a damaged piece of circuit, the result of being mislaid badly during the winter, which duly sent the Brabham drifting back across the track.[2]

Try as he might, Hunt had no way to avoid the oncoming Brabham, although he miraculously managed to avoid damage as Pace's nose drifted into the Brit's rear wheel.[2] Hunt duly sprinted away, while Pace's race was effectively over a hundred yards down the road when the entire nose section of his car flew into the air, taking out the remains of a damaged radiator on its way.[2] The frustrated Brazilian was left to limp back to the pits for repairs, although he would rejoin several laps down.[2]

That incident left Hunt leading from Reutemann, Mass and Andretti, although that little trio was about to be broken up.[2] Indeed, as Mass dived onto the brakes into turn three the McLaren suddenly jerked right, throwing the German into the catch fencing on the outside of the circuit.[2] The fencing was sent swirling into the air, landing just in time to collect Regazzoni as the Ensign rounded the corner a few seconds later.[2]

The Swiss racer had barely gone off the circuit when the next group arrived, Depailler sending himself into a spin while trying to avoid the mess spewing out in front of him.[2] He recovered having dropped to the back of the pack, a far better fate than his unsighted teammate Ronnie Peterson who suddenly found himself flying off the circuit.[2] The Swede had been right behind Tom Pryce's Shadow in the middle of Depailler's train, and therefore had little chance to take action when the Welshman jinked out of the way of the incident at the last moment.[2]

More drivers would narrowly avoid the incident in the following moments, both Niki Lauda and John Watson coming within inches of the wrecked cars having run wide at turn three.[2] A large factor in the accident, and its subsequent impact, was the continued deterioration of the tarmac on the outside of the circuit, which would be described by the aforementioned Lauda as "just like black ice".[2] Yet, despite the obvious danger the race continued on unabated, with the order substantially changed across the field.[2]

Indeed, Hunt was now left with a solid lead over Reutemann, the Argentine becoming the new target for Andretti's marauding Lotus.[2] Pryce now found himself in fourth having scraped through the incident as the Tyrrells spun around him, with Jacques Laffite behind in fifth.[2] Lauda and Watson were next after their brief scares, with the rest of the field someway behind after their own dramas earlier on.[2]

As half distance came and went, however, Hunt's supremacy at the front of the field was coming under increasing scrutiny, with Reutemann able to close onto the McLaren at a fair rate.[2] The Brit had been fighting with alarming front tyre wear, a result of the team's established race-setup to deploy a car with natural understeer, while the Argentine had been released from Andretti's grasp when the Lotus' electrical system failed.[2] On lap 23 the Ferrari barged past the McLaren for the lead, prompting Hunt to pit for fresh tyres at the end of that lap.[2]

The defending World Champion rejoined just behind Lauda and Watson, dealing with them in short order before sprinting off after the now second placed Pryce.[2] The Welshman, however, had a sizeable advantage over the Englishman, although his Shadow was struggling with an overheating engine.[2] Time would tell as to whether Hunt could catch Pryce before the end of the race, with Reutemann already cruising with a huge lead at the head of the field.[2]

Elsewhere, Depailler had been forced to stop in the pits after his spin, seeing a punctured tyre and radiator replaced, before crashing into the remains of Mass' McLaren just after half-distance.[2] That wrote off both cars, which had only suffered minor damage to that point, a few laps before Laffite did the exact same to Brambilla's Surtees, which had come to a stop at the corner before Mass' accident.[2] Four laps passed before Watson charged into the wreckage, although he at least had the excuse of a punctured front tyre.[2]

A couple more laps passed before the seventh visitor to the turn three scrapyard arrived, Pace arriving far too fast to avoid the damaged tarmac to park his Brabham alongside his teammates.[2] Hans Binder, meanwhile, had found a different corner to crash at, the Surtees suffering a front brake failure, although he, like everyone stranded at turn three, climbed out uninjured.[2] Moments later and the fifteenth retirement of the day was confirmed, with Pryce's Shadow expiring at the side of the circuit with an engine failure.[2]

With that the race was run, with Reutemann cruising home to record his first victory for Ferrari, ten seconds clear of the charging Hunt, who had just pulled in sight of Pryce's Shadow as the engine expired.[2] Lauda was a quiet third and the last man on the lead lap, while Emerson Fittipaldi brought an unscathed Fittipaldi home fourth in spite of a late stop to replace a punctured tyre.[2] Nilsson recovered to fifth after his early dramas with Renzo Zorzi claiming the final point in sixth for Shadow.[2] Ingo Hoffmann was the only other recorded finisher, having been a non-factor throughout, but importantly on the circuit at the chequered flag.[2]

ResultsEdit

The full results for the 1977 Brazilian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 12 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Italy Ferrari 40 1:45:07.72 2 9
2 1 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 40 +10.71s 1 6
3 11 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Ferrari 40 +1:47.51 13 4
4 28 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 39 +1 Lap 16 3
5 6 Sweden Gunnar Nilsson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 39 +1 Lap 10 2
6 17 Italy Renzo Zorzi United Kingdom Shadow-Ford Cosworth 39 +1 Lap 18 1
7 29 Brazil Ingo Hoffmann Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 38 +2 Laps 19
Ret 8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Brabham-Alfa Romeo 33 Accident 5
Ret 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United Kingdom Shadow-Ford Cosworth 33 Engine 12
Ret 18 Austria Hans Binder United Kingdom Surtees-Ford Cosworth 32 Suspension 20
Ret 7 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom Brabham-Alfa Romeo 30 Accident 7
Ret 26 France Jacques Laffite France Ligier-Matra 26 Accident 14
Ret 4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 23 Accident 6
Ret 5 United States Mario Andretti United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 19 Ignition 3
Ret 9 Brazil Alex Ribeiro United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 16 Engine 21
Ret 2 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 12 Accident 4
Ret 3 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 12 Accident 8
Ret 22 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 12 Accident 9
Ret 19 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom Surtees-Ford Cosworth 11 Accident 11
Ret 20 South Africa Jody Scheckter Canada Wolf-Ford Cosworth 11 Engine 15
Ret 10 South Africa Ian Scheckter United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 1 Transmission 17
Ret 14 Australia Larry Perkins United Kingdom BRM 1 Overheating 22
Source:[5]

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

A maiden victory for Carlos Reutemann at his new team was enough to propel the Argentine racer to the top of the standings, four ahead of Jody Scheckter in second. Three drivers were now level on six points, Carlos Pace ahead of James Hunt and Emerson Fittipaldi by virtue of count-back, with Niki Lauda two behind in sixth. Other drivers to add their name to score sheet included Gunnar Nilsson and Renzo Zorzi, meaning there were ten drivers with points to their name after just two races.

The double podium for Ferrari was enough to put them atop the International Cup for Constructors standings, leaving South America with thirteen points to their name. Wolf-Ford Cosworth slipped to second ahead of Brabham-Alfa Romeo in third. The latter squad found themselves level on points with McLaren-Ford Cosworth and Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth, with Lotus-Ford Cosworth a couple behind in sixth.

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 Argentina Carlos Reutemann 13 ▲3
2 South Africa Jody Scheckter 9 ▼1
3 Brazil Carlos Pace 6 ▼1
4 United Kingdom James Hunt 6 ▲10
5 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi 6 ▼1
6 Austria Niki Lauda 4 ▲12
7 United States Mario Andretti 2 ▼2
8 Sweden Gunnar Nilsson 2 ▲13
9 Italy Renzo Zorzi 1 ▲11
10 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni 1 ▼4
International Cup for Constructors
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 Italy Ferrari 13 ▲2
2 Canada Wolf-Ford Cosworth 9 ▼1
3 United Kingdom Brabham-Alfa Romeo 6 ▼1
4 United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 6 ▲8
5 Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 6 ▼1
6 United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 4 ▼1
7 United Kingdom Shadow-Ford Cosworth 1 ▲1
8 United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 1 ▼2

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRAZILIAN GP, 1977', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2015), http://www.grandprix.com/races/brazilian-gp-1977.html, (Accessed 30/03/2018)
  2. 2.000 2.001 2.002 2.003 2.004 2.005 2.006 2.007 2.008 2.009 2.010 2.011 2.012 2.013 2.014 2.015 2.016 2.017 2.018 2.019 2.020 2.021 2.022 2.023 2.024 2.025 2.026 2.027 2.028 2.029 2.030 2.031 2.032 2.033 2.034 2.035 2.036 2.037 2.038 2.039 2.040 2.041 2.042 2.043 2.044 2.045 2.046 2.047 2.048 2.049 2.050 2.051 2.052 2.053 2.054 2.055 2.056 2.057 2.058 2.059 2.060 2.061 2.062 2.063 2.064 2.065 2.066 2.067 2.068 2.069 2.070 2.071 2.072 2.073 2.074 2.075 2.076 2.077 2.078 2.079 2.080 2.081 2.082 2.083 2.084 2.085 2.086 2.087 2.088 2.089 2.090 2.091 2.092 2.093 2.094 2.095 2.096 2.097 2.098 2.099 2.100 2.101 2.102 2.103 A.H., 'The Brazilian Grand Prix: Reutemann wins through the carnage', motorsportmagazine.com, (Motor Sport, 01/03/1977), https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/march-1977/55/brazilian-grand-prix, (Accessed 30/03/2018)
  3. 'Brazil 1977: Entrants', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1977/bresil/engages.aspx, (Accessed 30/03/2018)
  4. 'Brazil 1977: Qualifications', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1977/bresil/qualification.aspx, (Accessed 31/03/2018)
  5. 'Brazil 1977: Result', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2015), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1977/bresil/classement.aspx, (Accessed 31/03/2018)
V T E 1977 Formula One Season
Teams Apollon • Brabham • Boro • BRM • Ensign • Ferrari • Fittipaldi • Hesketh • Kojima • LEC • Ligier • Lotus • March • McGuire • McLaren • Penske • Renault • Shadow • Surtees • Tyrrell • Wolf
Engines Alfa Romeo • BRM • Ferrari • Ford Cosworth • Matra • Renault
Drivers Andersson • Andretti • Ashley • Binder • Bleekemolen • Brambilla • Depailler • de Dryver • Edwards • Ertl • Fittipaldi • Francia • Giacomelli • Hayje • Henton • Heyer • Hoffman • Hoshino • Hunt • Ickx • Jabouille • Jarier • Jones • Keegan • Kessel • Kozarowitzky • Laffite • Lauda • Leoni • Lunger • Mass • McGuire • Merzario • Neve • Nilsson • Oliver • Ongais • Pace • Patrese • Perkins • Peterson • Pilette • Purley • Pryce • Rebaque • Regazzoni • Reutemann • Ribeiro • I. Scheckter • J. Scheckter • Schuppan • Stuck • Sutcliffe • Takahashi • Takahara • Tambay • Trimmer • Villeneuve • de Villota • Watson • Zorzi
Cars Apollon Fly • Brabham BT45 • Boro 001 • BRM P201 • BRM P207 • Ensign N177 • Ferrari 312T • Fittipaldi FD04 • Fittipaldi F5 • Hesketh 308 • Kojima KE009 • LEC CRP1 • Ligier JS7 • Lotus 78 • March 761 • March 771 • McGuire BM1 • McLaren M23 • McLaren M26 • Penske PC4 • Renault RS01 • Shadow DN5 • Shadow DN8 • Surtees TS19 • Tyrrell 007 • Tyrrell P34 • Wolf WR1 • Wolf WR2 • Wolf WR3
Tyres Bridgestone • Dunlop • Goodyear • Michelin
Races Argentina • Brazil • South Africa • United States West • Spain • Monaco • Belgium • Sweden • France • Britain • Germany • Austria • Netherlands • Italy • United States • Canada • Japan
Non-championship Races Race of Champions
See also 1976 Formula One Season • 1978 Formula One Season • Category
V T E Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix
Circuits Interlagos (1972 - 1977, 1979 - 1980, 1990 - Present), Jacarepaguá (1978, 1981 - 1989)
Interlagos1990
Races 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 • 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 • 2018 • 2019
Non-Championship Race 1972
v·d·e Nominate this page for Featured Article
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.