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  The 1975 German Grand Prix, otherwise known as the XXXVII Großer Preis von Deutschland, was the eleventh round of the 1975 FIA Formula One World Championship, staged at the Nürburgring on the 3rd August 1975.[1] It would be a typically torturous trip to the Eifel Mountains for the F1 circus, with a high drop-out rate across both practice and race.[1]

Qualifying had seen Niki Lauda produce one of the greatest pole laps of all time, a 6:58.6 making him the fastest man to ever lap the Nordschleife circuit before it was remodeled in the early 1980s.[1] Carlos Pace would share the front row, just falling shy of the seven minute barrier, although these efforts were overshadowed by a huge accident for Ian Ashley at Pflanzgarten, who had to be extracted from his Williams with severe ankle injuries.[1]

It was pole sitting Lauda who took the lead at the start of the race on Sunday, fending off a half challenge from Pace before disappearing off onto the Nordschleife for the first time.[1] Third place starter Jody Scheckter, in contrast, went to the back of the field after making a mess of the start, leaving teammate Patrick Depailler to chase after Pace and Lauda.[1]

The opening lap would see the second big accident of thje weekend, as Jochen Mass' McLaren was thrown into the barriers at Fuchsrohe by a front tyre failure.[1] As he clambered out unharmed, Mark Donohue had an identical failure but somehow kept his March on the tarmac, while Ronnie Peterson crawled back to the pits with terminal gearbox failure.[1]

The order soon settled as the opening laps ticked past, with Lauda leading from Depailler, Pace, Carlos Reutemann and Clay Regazzoni.[1] Emerson Fittipaldi was briefly up with them until he suffered a puncture, before ultimately retiring with suspension failure as a result, while the rest of field was thinned by mechanical strife.[1]

It took until the fifth lap for the plague of attrition to hit the front of the field, as Pace dropped out of the running with a suspension destroying puncture.[1] Scheckter, meanwhile, had just got the lead pack in his sights before his Tyrrell threw itself into the wall with a puncture, just before Depailler dropped out of contention with collapsed suspension.[1] Regazzoni was therefore promoted to second having elbowed out Reutemann, although his time behind Lauda was shortlived as his Ferrari F12 expired in a cloud of steam.[1]

It seemed inevitable that there would be more failures as the race entered its final stages, and so there was no real surprise when Lauda came crawling into the pits as the latest victim of a puncture.[1] Reutemann duly inherited the lead with James Hunt hunting him down, only for the Hesketh to suffer a hub failure, while third placed Tom Pryce had to slow as fuel was leaking into his cockpit.[1]

Reutemann duly cruised home to claim victory for Brabham after fourteen laps, over a minute and a half ahead of Jacques Laffite, who scored his and Williams' first podium finish by taking Pryce in the closing stages.[1] Lauda also took the Welshman to claim third and extend his Championship lead, with Pryce, Alan Jones and Gijs van Lennep completing the points.[1]

BackgroundEdit

The Nürburgring had been gradually brought up to the safety standards of other smaller circuits in the early 1970s, although all of the minor changes made to the Nordschleife each season only made the circuit faster.[2] 1975 had seen some more barrier rails erected and trees moved further from the side of the circuit, while some resurfacing work had been completed after the Karussell.[2] Yet, while the Nordschleife was looking more refined than ever, it would be hosting a Formula One field still carrying bruises from a brutal British Grand Prix a fortnight earlier.[2]

The big victims at Silverstone had proved to be Team Surtees, whom had lost both cars to heavy damage in the closing stages and lacked the budget to repair them quickly.[2] Lead driver John Watson was therefore loaned out to Team Lotus for the German Grand Prix, with the Ulsterman slotted in the #6 car alongside Ronnie Peterson.[2] Post-Silverstone repairs at Lotus, however, had forced them to use all of their experimental parts, and so Watson would race a 72 designated as a "72F".[2]

Elsewhere, the relatively unscathed Ferrari team arrived with a familiar trio of cars, Clay Regazzoni and Niki Lauda hoping that the 312T would be suited to the Eifel Mountain torture.[2] Brabham arrived with a trio of ever smart cars for Carlos Reutemann and Carlos Pace, as did McLaren for Emerson Fittipaldi and Jochen Mass.[2] Another three car/two driver effort were Shadow, who were relieved that Jean-Pierre Jarier had been deemed fit to take on the Nordschleife after a knock to the head at Silverstone.[2] Tom Pryce would also race as usual.

March used the money from selling a car to Penske to fund their post-Silverstone rebuilds, meaning they could once again field a trio of Vittorio Brambilla, Hans-Joachim Stuck and Lella Lombardi.[2] The Penske team had also had Mark Donohue's 751 rebuilt in time to take on the Nordschleife, while rivals Parnelli had had little to do on Mario Andretti's pair of cars.[2] Other non-European entries arrived in the form of Wilson Fittipaldi's self built creation, and the Maki in the hands of Tony Trimmer.[2]

Hesketh, meanwhile, were back up to a two car entry, two chassis arriving for James Hunt while the older 308 was loaned out to Austrian journalist Harald Ertl, whom had sponsorship from the Warsteiner Brewery.[2] Williams were also back up to a two car effort, drafting in Ian Ashley to actually partner Jacques Laffite.[2] Hill arrived with Tony Brise and Alan Jones in the hotseats yet again, the former still carrying some of his Silverstone facial wounds, while the latter was simply happy to have finished a fortnight earlier.[2]

Tyrrell had their usual pair of Jody Scheckter and Patrick Depailler in action, as hopes of entering a third driver disappeared after Silverstone. Completing the field should have been the BRM of Bob Evans, which actually made it to the circuit, only to be loaded back into the transporter within minutes of its arrival.[2]

Victory in Silverstone had moved Emerson Fittipaldi into second place in the hunt for the World Championship in 1975, although he was still fourteen points off the lead. Lauda had remained the man to beat in-spite his first non-score in five races, with the rest of the field running out of time to close the gap. Reutemann and Hunt arrived in Germany level on points for third, while Pace completed the top five.

Ferrari would lead the International Cup for Manufacturers' charge into Germany, although their non-score at Silverstone had allowed Brabham-Ford Cosworth to close the gap to eight points. McLaren-Ford Cosworth had also edged closer, moving within three points of Brabham, while Hesketh-Ford Cosworth cemented their position in fourth ahead of Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth. March-Ford Cosworth, meanwhile, had moved ahead of Penske-Ford Cosworth thanks to Mark Donohue's recent change of allegiances.

Entry listEdit

The full entry list for the 1975 German Grand Prix is outlined below:

No. Driver Entreat Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi United Kingdom Marlboro Team McLaren McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
2 Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom Marlboro Team McLaren McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
3 South Africa Jody Scheckter United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
5 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 72E Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
6 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 72F Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann United Kingdom Martini Racing Brabham BT44B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Martini Racing Brabham BT44B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
9 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom Beta Team March March 751 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
10 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck United Kingdom Lavazza March March 751 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 G
12 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312T Ferrari 015 3.0 F12 G
14 United Kingdom Bob Evans United Kingdom Stanley BRM BRM P201 BRM P200 3.0 V12 G
16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United States UOP Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN5 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier United States UOP Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN5 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
19 Netherlands Gijs van Lennep United Kingdom Team Ensign Ensign N174 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
20 United Kingdom Ian Ashley United Kingdom Frank Williams Racing Cars Williams FW Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
21 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Frank Williams Racing Cars Williams FW04 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
22 Australia Alan Jones United Kingdom Embassy Racing with Graham Hill Hill GH1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
23 United Kingdom Tony Brise United Kingdom Embassy Racing with Graham Hill Hill GH1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
24 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom Hesketh Racing Hesketh 308 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
25 Austria Harald Ertl Austria Warsteiner Brewery Hesketh 308 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
27 United States Mario Andretti United States Vel's Parnelli Jones Racing Parnelli VPJ4 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
28 United States Mark Donohue United States Penske Cars March 751 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
29 Italy Lella Lombardi United Kingdom Lavazza March March 751 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
30 Brazil Wilson Fittipaldi Brazil Copersucar-Fittipaldi Fittipaldi FD02 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
35 United Kingdom Tony Trimmer Japan Maki Engineering Maki F101C Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
Source:[3]

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

Other than a brief shower to open the weekend, the Eifel Mountains were uncharacteristically warm for the German Grand Prix weekend, with practice/qualifying held in particularly pleasant weather.[2] Four sessions were scheduled ahead of the race on Sunday, with two sessions of two hours apiece staged on both Friday and Saturday.[2] As ever, the constant revisions to the Nordschleife meant that times were once again expected to plummet, meaning Niki Lauda's 1974 pole time of 7:00.8 was the target for the "aces" at the front of the pack.[2]

ReportEdit

The first session on Friday would see the conventional start to a weekend at the Nürburgring, as drivers completed multiple "install" laps around "the loop" at the start of the lap.[2] Because of the Nordschleife's gargantuan size, the organisers allowed drivers to use a small section of the circuit, running past the pits to Sudkurve before looping back to the Nordkurve at the back of the paddock.[2] At this point drivers had the option of cutting back onto the start/finish straight, or taking the "North Curve" properly and disappear off onto a full lap of the Nordschleife.[2]

With most of Friday morning spent, circuit record holder Lauda was the first to set a serious time of the Nordschleife, quickly getting down to a 7:00.6.[2] As he set the standard, Patrick Depailler hit trouble in his Tyrrell, a suspension failure leaving him stranded on the Nordschleife for the rest of the morning.[2] Or at least it should have, but the resourceful Frenchman put his engineering skills to the test by borrowing a spectator's tool kit, slackened off the shock-absorber on the diagonally opposite corner, before tightening up the opposing pair.[2] The result was a lop-sided Tyrrell with the damaged corner hanging in the air, but Depailler did manage to limp back to the pits for repairs.[2]

Most of the field had completed a representative lap around the Nordschleife before the lunch break, meaning the afternoon session on Friday was far more relaxed than usual.[2] Pace setters Lauda and teammate Clay Regazzoni spent the afternoon focusing on their race setups, meaning it was Vittorio Brambilla who ended the session fastest, but was almost six seconds slower then Lauda's morning effort.[2] Others to stand out were John Watson in his loaned Lotus, beating temporary teammate Ronnie Peterson's morning effort, while Jochen Mass showed some strong race pace ahead of his home race.[2]

However, things would not go so well for the German on Saturday morning, as the #2 McLaren went flying into the trees towards the end of the session, leaving Mass with the spare.[2] As he awaited a lift back to the pits, Regazzoni set the pace with a 7:01.6 to share the provisional front row with Lauda, with the rest of the field struggling to break 7:03.0.[2] Indeed, the only men other than the two Ferraris to break that barrier would be Emerson Fittipaldi, Jody Scheckter, and local racer Hans-Joachim Stuck.[2]

The final session would see Ferrari almost get caught out by the chasing pack, as the two Tyrrells of Scheckter and Depailler went got inbetween the two scarlet cars towards the end of the session.[2] Regazzoni was unable to respond, but Lauda somewhat stole the show, becoming the first man to officially lap the Nordschleife in under seven minutes, recording a 6:58.6 right at the end of the session.[2] His efforts overshadowed an equally late run by Carlos Pace for Brabham, as the Brazilian came from nowhere to record a 7:00.0 lap, putting him second on the grid.[2]

Qualifying ResultsEdit

The full qualifying results for the 1975 German Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time Gap
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
1 12 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Ferrari 7:00.6 7:09.9 7:02.4 6:58.6
2 8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 7:26.7 7:13.3 7:07.6 7:00.0 +1.4s
3 3 South Africa Jody Scheckter United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 7:11.6 7:07.2 7:02.3 7:01.3 +2.7s
4 4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 8:12.5 7:02.7 7:01.4 +2.8s
5 11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Italy Ferrari 7:04.3 7:19.6 7:01.6 7:02.2 +3.0s
6 2 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 7:01.8 7:06.3 7:04.2 7:03.0T +3.2s
7 10 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 7:08.5 7:08.3 7:02.9 7:02.1 +3.5s
8 1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 7:02.7 7:14.7 7:02.8 7:03.6 +4.1s
9 24 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 7:13.7 7:14.6 7:04.2 7:02.7 +4.1s
10 7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 7:21.8 7:10.8 7:04.0 7:04.7 +5.4s
11 9 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 7:15.5 7:06.0 7:10.9 7:07.4 +7.4s
12 17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 7:15.1 7:07.6 7:07.1 7:16.6 +8.5s
13 27 United States Mario Andretti United States Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 7:14.9 7:16.6 7:08.3 7:08.2 +9.6s
14 6 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 7:14.1 7:13.3 7:09.4 7:14.1 +10.8s
15 21 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams-Ford Cosworth 7:20.3 7:22.5 7:10.8 7:10.0 +11.4s
16 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 7:12.2 7:25.7 7:10.1T 7:25.5T +11.5s
17 23 United Kingdom Tony Brise United Kingdom Hill-Ford Cosworth 7:21.3 7:16.2T 7:13.3T 7:10.9 +12.3s
18 5 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 7:13.3 7:11.6 7:12.1 +13.0s
19 28 United States Mark Donohue United States March-Ford Cosworth 7:26.6 7:27.6 7:18.9 7:11.8 +13.2s
20* 20 United Kingdom Ian Ashley United Kingdom Williams-Ford Cosworth 7:26.3 7:21.8 7:15.9 7:18.7 +17.3s
21 22 Australia Alan Jones United Kingdom Hill-Ford Cosworth 7:41.3 7:43.7 7:18.6 7:19.3 +20.0s
22 30 Brazil Wilson Fittipaldi Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 7:21.5 7:27.3 7:22.0 7:19.1 +20.5s
23 25 Austria Harald Ertl Austria Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 7:32.0 7:28.8 7:19.5 7:30.5 +20.9s
24 19 Netherlands Gijs van Lennep United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 7:40.2 7:28.1 7:20.4 7:25.0 +21.8s
25 29 Italy Lella Lombardi United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 7:42.3 7:51.2 7:36.4 7:44.5 +37.8s
DNQ 35 United Kingdom Tony Trimmer Japan Maki-Ford Cosworth 8:50.4 8:24.1 7:53.4 7:43.1 +44.5s
WD 14 United Kingdom Bob Evans United Kingdom BRM
Source:[2][4]
  • T Indicates a driver used their test/spare car to set their best time in that session.
  • Bold indicates a driver's best/qualifying time.
  • * Ashley was unable to take the start of the race due to his accident in qualifying

GridEdit

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 1 ______________
Niki Lauda 2
______________ Carlos Pace
Row 2 3 ______________
Jody Scheckter 4
______________ Patrick Depailler
Row 3 5 ______________
Clay Regazzoni 6
______________ Jochen Mass
Row 4 7 ______________
Hans-Joachim Stuck 8
______________ Emerson Fittipaldi
Row 5 9 ______________
James Hunt 10
______________ Carlos Reutemann
Row 6 11 ______________
Vittorio Brambilla 12
______________ Jean-Pierre Jarier
Row 7 13 ______________
Mario Andretti 14
______________ John Watson
Row 8 15 ______________
Jacques Laffite 16
______________ Tom Pryce
Row 9 17 ______________
Tony Brise 18
______________ Ronnie Peterson
Row 10 19 ______________
Mark Donohue 20
______________ Ian Ashley*
Row 11 21 ______________
Alan Jones 22
______________ Wilson Fittipaldi
Row 12 23 ______________
Harald Ertl 24
______________ Gijs van Lennep
Row 13 25 ______________
Lella Lombardi 26
______________
  • * Ashley was unable to start the race due to his injuries from qualifying.

RaceEdit

Sunday proved to be a cloudless day for the race around the Nürburgring, drawing a reported 400,000 strong crowd to the Eifel Mountains before the start.[2] The thirty minute warm-up session saw everyone bar Carlos Pace and Harald Ertl complete a full lap, although they would join the twenty-two drivers to complete a lap that morning on the grid.[2] The only absentees from the start would be Ian Ashley, whose Williams was beyond repair, and Tony Trimmer who had proved too slow to be safely considered.[2]

ReportEdit

Given his performance in qualifying there was little surprise when pole sitter Niki Lauda shot off into the lead at the start, leaving Pace to fend off a fast starting Patrick Depailler.[2] Jody Scheckter, meanwhile, mistimed his start and burned out his clutch causing him to drop towards the back of the field.[2] Ronnie Peterson had a similar issue in the Lotus, although his slipping clutch meant he was left behind completely as the rest thundered into Sudkurve.[2]

Onto the Nordschleife for the first time and it was Lauda leading from Depailler and Pace, the Frenchman having elbowed his way past into Nordkurve.[2] Behind them came Carlos Reutemann and Clay Regazzoni duelling for fourth, while Jochen Mass led the rest of the field through until Fuchsrohe.[2] It was at that point that the #2 McLaren suffered a front tyre failure, putting Mass heavily into the barriers as the rest thundered through the debris field.[2] Fortunately, Mass was able to escape the destroyed M23 without injury.[2]

The rest of the opening tour proved to be less eventful, as Lauda led Depailler, Pace, Reutemann, Regazzoni and the rest past the line.[2] Scheckter was making his way up the order smartly after his messy start, already back into the top fifteen, while Peterson crawled round at the back of the field to have his clutch looked at.[2] While he was receiving attention, Mark Donohue dragged his customer March into the pits having picked up a puncture from the Mass wreckage.[2]

Suspension damage soon became the issue throughout the field, as Emerson Fittipaldi became the next victim of his teammate's early accident and picked up a puncture.[2] As he limped round, Donohue charged out of the pits, only to suffer a rather more spectacular puncture en-route to Aremberg, littering the circuit with rubber chunks.[2] The failure also destroyed the March's rear suspension, leaving him stuck at the side of the road for the rest of the afternoon.[2]

Fittipaldi rejoined well of the back of the pack, but called time on his race with a bad vibration, a symptom of imminent suspension failure.[2] Peterson had already called time on his race with an incurable clutch slip, while the sister car of John Watson lasted until lap three when his suspension collapsed.[2] Indeed, the Ulsterman had been heading towards Aremberg when his 72F threw itself across the track, narrowly avoiding Donohue's abandoned March, although he slid right into the path of Scheckter.[2] Fortunately, the South African racer was on top form in the midst of his recovery drive, and miraculously found a space past the terminally damaged Lotus.[2]

Out front, meanwhile, it was Regazzoni who provided the entertainment, moving past Reutemann and Pace before beginning to hunt down second placed Depailler.[2] As he disappeared up the road, Pace's race effectively came to an end when he picked up a puncture, which, like most of those that came before, would damage the Brazilian's suspension to the point of failure.[2] He duly crawled back to the pits for a new tyre, only to stop out on circuit barely a lap later with collapsed suspension.[2]

Back with the leaders, and Depailler was nothing short of stunning in his fight with Lauda, remaining glued to the back of the Ferrari regardless of whether the pair were crawling through the Karussell, or dancing through Schwedenkreuz at over 160mph.[2] As they continued to pound around the Eifel Mountains, Regazzoni established himself in third, while Reutemann was moving clear of fifth placed James Hunt, whose Hesketh was misfiring at high-revs.[2] Behind them came the recovering Scheckter, who was being shadowed by both Shadows of Jean-Pierre Jarier and Tom Pryce as the race blasted past half-distance.[2]

Unfortunately for the spectators, the Scheckter charge would end soon after this point, the Tyrrell suddenly disappearing into the barriers as "something let go at the back".[2] Jarier was the first man on scene and duly picked up a puncture from the remains of Scheckter's car, beginning another slow limp to the pits.[2] He, however, would not make it back for repairs as the disintegrating tyre wrapped itself around a driveshaft and broke it.[2]

As Scheckter went out, teammate Depailler had dramas of this own, a front suspension failure on lap eight meaning he had to limp back to the pits for repairs.[2] This allowed Regazzoni to move into second, although before he could settle into position behind teammate Lauda, his Ferrari engine expired in a cloud of smoke.[2] However, attention would be drawn away from the smoking Swiss as Tony Brise hit the wall at high-speed, the Hill having suffered a rear suspension failure on the run from Bergwerk.[2]

Having seen all of this, Lauda's pace had dramatically dropped off out front, Depailler's failure in particular prompting the Austrian to settle his pace down.[2] Yet, that was not enough to make him immune to failure, and with a certain inevitability the dominant #12 car finally hit some errant stones and picked up a puncture, making him the latest man to crawl back to the pits.[2] Reutemann duly inherited the lead from the Austrian towards the end of the lap, with Hunt, Pryce and Jacques Laffite also flashing past.[2]

The rather surprised Reutemann would ease his pace from this point on, aided by the near immediate departure of Hunt, who sensed an imminent failure of his clutch and so smarty used "the loop" to pull into the paddock.[2] Pryce briefly threatened until his fuel-filler cap developed a leak, meaning his cockpit was beginning to fill with petrol and fumes.[2] His pace duly collapsed as he simply sought to finish, allowing Laffite to pass with ease on lap 12.[2]

That move by Laffite left him in prime position to pick up a maiden victory for himself and Frank Williams, although it would have to come as a result of an issue for Reutemann.[2] Time was running out, however, and as they began their final tour of the Nordschleife, a recovering Lauda dived past Pryce for third before storming off to chase a lost win.[2] With a huge gap behind to Alan Jones, Pryce decided to undo his safety harness and complete the final lap half-standing having picked up some petrol burns.[2]

Ultimately, Reutemann was not to suffer a failure, and so the Argentine cruised home to record his second win of the season.[2] Laffite was a delighted second, over a minute and a half behind, while Lauda was a little frustrated in third.[2] Pryce was a heroic fourth ahead of an unnoticed Jones in the sole surviving Hill, while Gijs van Lennep drove a solid race to score the final point in the new Ensign.[2] Lella Lombardi, Harald Ertl and Depailler completed the finishers list, while Mario Andretti was classified despite having to stop with a fuel leak.[2]

ResultsEdit

The full results for the 1975 German Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 14 1:41:14.1 10 9
2 21 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Williams-Ford Cosworth 14 +1:37.7 15 6
3 12 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Ferrari 14 +2:23.3 1 4
4 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 14 +3:31.4 16 3
5 22 Australia Alan Jones United Kingdom Hill-Ford Cosworth 14 +3:50.3 21 2
6 19 Netherlands Gijs van Lennep United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 14 +5:05.5 24 1
7 29 Italy Lella Lombardi United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 14 +7:30.4 25
8 25 Austria Harald Ertl Austria Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 14 +7:40.9 23
9 4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 13 +1 Lap 4
10* 27 United States Mario Andretti United States Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 12 Fuel leak 13
Ret 24 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 10 Wheel 9
Ret 11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Italy Ferrari 9 Engine 5
Ret 23 United Kingdom Tony Brise United Kingdom Hill-Ford Cosworth 9 Accident 17
Ret 3 South Africa Jody Scheckter United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 7 Accident 3
Ret 17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 7 Puncture 12
Ret 8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 5 Tyre 2
Ret 30 Brazil Wilson Fittipaldi Brazil Fittipaldi-Ford Cosworth 4 Engine 22
Ret 1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 3 Puncture 8
Ret 10 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 3 Engine 7
Ret 9 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 3 Puncture 11
Ret 6 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 2 Suspension 14
Ret 5 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 1 Clutch 18
Ret 28 United States Mark Donohue United States March-Ford Cosworth 1 Suspension 19
Ret 2 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 0 Accident 6
DNS 20 United Kingdom Ian Ashley United Kingdom Williams-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 35 United Kingdom Tony Trimmer Japan Maki-Ford Cosworth
WD 14 United Kingdom Bob Evans United Kingdom BRM
Source:[5]
  • * Andretti was still classified despite retiring as he had completed 90% of the race distance.

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

Victory allowed Carlos Reutemann to move back ahead of Emerson Fittipaldi in the World Championship standings, but Niki Lauda's third place was enough to draw his lead out to seventeen points. James Hunt retained fourth ahead of Carlos Pace, both still in the fight for second, while Jody Scheckter remained in sixth. Elsewhere, Jacques Laffite was in the top ten after his maiden podium, while Alan Jones and Gijs van Lennep broke into the top twenty.

Ferrari saw their lead over Brabham-Ford Cosworth cut to just three points in Germany, the attritional race meaning the British squad still had real hopes of taking the International Cup for Manufacturers. McLaren-Ford Cosworth had lost ground in third, while Hesketh-Ford Cosworth were still fending off Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth for fourth. Shadow-Ford Cosworth, meanwhile, moved ahead of Lotus-Ford Cosworth, leaving the Norfolk squad level on points with new boys Williams-Ford Cosworth.

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 Austria Niki Lauda 51
2 Argentina Carlos Reutemann 34 ▲2
3 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi 33 ▼1
4 United Kingdom James Hunt 25 ▼1
5 Brazil Carlos Pace 24
6 South Africa Jody Scheckter 19
7 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni 16
8 West Germany Jochen Mass 14.5
9 France Patrick Depailler 12
10 France Jacques Laffite 6 ▲9
11 United States Mario Andretti 5 ▼1
12 United Kingdom Tom Pryce 5 ▲3
13 United States Mark Donohue 4 ▼2
14 Belgium Jacky Ickx 3 ▼1
15 Sweden Ronnie Peterson 3 ▼1
16 Italy Vittorio Brambilla 2 ▼1
17 Australia Alan Jones 2 ▲3
18 France Jean-Pierre Jarier 1.5 ▼1
19 United Kingdom Tony Brise 1 ▼2
20 Netherlands Gijs van Lennep 1 ▲1
21 Italy Lella Lombardi 0.5 ▼3
International Cup for Manufacturers
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 Italy Ferrari 54
2 United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 51 (53)
3 United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 39.5
4 United Kingdom Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 25
5 United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 24
6 United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 6.5 ▲2
7 United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 6 ▼1
8 United Kingdom Williams-Ford Cosworth 6 ▲4
9 United States Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 5 ▼2
10 United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 3 ▼1
11 United Kingdom Hill-Ford Cosworth 3
12 United States Penske-Ford Cosworth 2 ▼2
13 United Kingdom Ensign-Ford Cosworth 1 ▲1

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: GERMAN GP, 1975', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr261.html, (Accessed 25/11/2017)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 2.31 2.32 2.33 2.34 2.35 2.36 2.37 2.38 2.39 2.40 2.41 2.42 2.43 2.44 2.45 2.46 2.47 2.48 2.49 2.50 2.51 2.52 2.53 2.54 2.55 2.56 2.57 2.58 2.59 2.60 2.61 2.62 2.63 2.64 2.65 2.66 2.67 2.68 2.69 2.70 2.71 2.72 2.73 2.74 2.75 2.76 2.77 2.78 2.79 2.80 D.S.J., 'The German Grand Prix: Reality', motorsportmagazine.com, (Motor Sport, 01/09/1975), http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/september-1975/26/german-grand-prix-reality, (Accessed 25/11/2017)
  3. 'Germany 1975: Entrants', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1975/allemagne/engages.aspx, (Accessed 25/11/2017)
  4. 'Germany 1975: Qualifications', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1975/allemagne/qualification.aspx, (Accessed 25/11/2017)
  5. 'Germany 1975: Result', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1975/allemagne/classement.aspx, (Accessed 25/11/2017)
V T E 1975 Formula One Season
Constructors Brabham • BRM • Ensign • Ferrari • Fittipaldi • Hesketh • Hill • Lola • Lotus • Lyncar • Maki • March • McLaren • Parnelli • Penske • Shadow • Surtees • Tyrrell • Williams
Engines BRM • Ferrari • Ford Cosworth • Matra
Drivers Andretti • Ashley • Brambilla • Brise • Charlton • Crawford • Depailler • Donohue • Ertl • Evans • E. Fittipaldi • W. Fittipaldi • Fushida • Henton • Hill • Hunt • Ickx • Jabouille • Jarier • Jones • Keizan • Laffite • Lauda • Leclère • van Lennep • Lombardi • Magee • Mass • Merzario • Migault • Morgan • Nicholson • Pace • Palm • Peterson • Pryce • Regazzoni • Reutemann • I. Scheckter • J. Scheckter • Schuppan • Stommelen • Stuck • Trimmer • Tunmer • Vonlanthen • Watson • Wilds • Wunderink • Zorzi
Cars Brabham BT44 • BRM P201 • Ensign N174 • Ensign N175 • Ferrari 312B3-74 • Ferrari 312T • Fittipaldi FD01 • Fittipaldi FD02 • Fittipaldi FD03 • Hesketh 308 • Hesketh 308B • Hesketh 308C • Hill GH1 • Lola T370 • Lola T371 • Lotus 72E • Lyncar 006 • Maki F101C • March 741 • March 751 • McLaren M23 • Parnelli VPJ4 • Penske PC1 • Shadow DN3 • Shadow DN5 • Shadow DN7 • Surtees TS16 • Tyrrell 007 • Williams FW • Williams FW04
Tyres Firestone • Goodyear
Races Argentina • Brazil • South Africa • Spain • Monaco • Belgium • Sweden • Netherlands • France • Britain • Germany • Austria • Italy • United States
Non-championship Races Race of Champions • International Trophy • Swiss GP
See also 1974 Formula One Season • 1976 Formula One Season • Category
V T E Germany German Grand Prix
Circuits Nürburgring (1951–1954, 1956–1958, 1960–1969, 1970–1976, 1985, 2007–2013*), AVUS (1959), Hockenheimring (1970, 1977–1984, 1986–2006, 2007–2014*, 2016, 2018–2019)
Nurburgring2002
Hockenheimring2002
Races 1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959 • 1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964 • 1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969 • 1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 • 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 • 2018 • 2019 • 2020 •
* Nürburgring and Hockenheimring alternated between each other during these years.
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