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{{Infobox Race
 
{{Infobox Race
| flag = MON
+
|flag = MON
| season = 1950
+
|season = 1950
| race = 2
+
|race = 2
| image = Monte Carlo 648.svg
+
|image = CircuitdeMonaco1950.png
| imagesize = 240px
+
|imagesize = 240px
| caption = The 1950 Monaco Circuit
+
|caption = The 1950 Monaco Circuit
| date = May 21
+
|date = May 21
| officialname = XI Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco
+
|officialname = XI Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco
| circuit = Circuit de Monaco
+
|circuit = Circuit de Monaco
| location = Monaco, Monte Carlo
+
|location = Monaco, Monte Carlo
| circuittype = Temporary Street Circuit
+
|circuittype = Temporary Street Circuit
| lapdistance = 3.181
+
|lapdistance = 3.181
| laps = 100
+
|laps = 100
| distance = 318.1
+
|distance = 318.1
| pole = Juan Manuel Fangio
+
|pole = Juan Manuel Fangio
| polenation = ARG
+
|polenation = ARG
| poleteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
|poleteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| poletime = 1:50.2
+
|poletime = 1:50.2
| fastestlap = 1:51.0
+
|fastestlap = 1:51.0
| fastestlapdriver = Juan Manuel Fangio
+
|fastestlapdriver = Juan Manuel Fangio
| fastestlapnation = ARG
+
|fastestlapnation = ARG
| fastestlapteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
|fastestlapteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| fastestlapnumber = 24
+
|fastestlapnumber =
| winner = Juan Manuel Fangio
+
|winner = Juan Manuel Fangio
| winnernation = ARG
+
|winnernation = ARG
| winnerteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
|winnerteam = {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| second = Alberto Ascari
+
|second = Alberto Ascari
| secondteam = {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
+
|secondteam = {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
| secondnation = ITA
+
|secondnation = ITA
| third = Louis Chiron
+
|third = Louis Chiron
| thirdteam = {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
|thirdteam = {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
| thirdnation = MON
+
|thirdnation = MON}}
}}
+
The '''1950 Monaco Grand Prix''' was the second race of the inaugural [[Formula One|Formula One World Championship]] in {{F1|1950}}. The 100-lap race took place on [[May 21|21 May]] 1950 and was won by [[Juan Manuel Fangio]] [[Grand Chelem|from lights to flag]]. Fangio also set the fastest lap, thus completing the second [[hat-trick]] in Formula One history, in the second race.
The '''1950 Monaco Grand Prix''' was the second race of the inaugural [[Formula One|Formula One World Championship]] in {{F1|1950}}. The 100-lap race took place on [[May 21|21 May]] 1950 and was won by [[Juan Manuel Fangio]] [[Grand Chelem|from lights to flag]]. Fangio also set the fastest lap, thus completing the second [[Grand Chelem]] in Formula One history, in the second race.
 
   
 
==Background==
 
==Background==
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The last race in 1948 had been won by Giuseppe Farina, the Alfa Romeo driver who had also had the pleasure of winning the opening round of the championship at Silverstone. Monaco had one representive for its nation in the race, Louis Chiron, the local favourite would be participating for the Maserati works. There was talk of Chiron taking a one-off drive at Alfa Romeo, if possible the Monagasque would be in prime position for the potential for a second home win, adding to his Monaco victory from way back in 1931. However Alfa Romeo opted to stick with its regular line-up of Farina, Fangio and Fagioli, although the team did name Chiron as their reserve driver for the weekend.
 
The last race in 1948 had been won by Giuseppe Farina, the Alfa Romeo driver who had also had the pleasure of winning the opening round of the championship at Silverstone. Monaco had one representive for its nation in the race, Louis Chiron, the local favourite would be participating for the Maserati works. There was talk of Chiron taking a one-off drive at Alfa Romeo, if possible the Monagasque would be in prime position for the potential for a second home win, adding to his Monaco victory from way back in 1931. However Alfa Romeo opted to stick with its regular line-up of Farina, Fangio and Fagioli, although the team did name Chiron as their reserve driver for the weekend.
   
The Monaco race would see the debut of manufacturers, Ferrari and Simca-Gordini in the world championship. Ferrari had snubbed the opening round of the championship at Silverstone, the team feeling the Brits prize money was insignificant, Enzo Ferrari placing greater value of a minor Formula Two race at Mons over the World Championship debut event. Following the Alfa Romeo domination at Silverstone, the Ferrari drivers of Luigi Villoresi, Alberto Ascari and Raymond Sommer were believed to be the only true rivals to the Alfa's strength. Aside from the works Ferrari's, Peter Whitehead would enter his privately owned Ferrari 125 to enter for the event. The Ferrari 125 was believed to be the only car capable of matching the Alfa's. It had been the strongest car throughout 1949 in the absence of the Alfa Romeo's following their withdrawal. However despite its speed it had yet to test itself against the mighty Alfa's. To make matters worse for Ferrari, the 125's lead designer, Gioacchino Colombo, had left the team to defect to Alfa Romeo upon their return in 1950. In response to this, the new lead designer for Ferrari, Aurelio Lampredi, had taken Colombo's promising your apprentice engineer Valerio Colotti for his own and had began designing a new Ferrari V12 engine to replace the current model of the 125.
+
The Monaco race would see the debut of manufacturers, Ferrari and Simca-Gordini in the world championship. Ferrari had snubbed the opening round of the championship at Silverstone, the team feeling the Brits prize money was insignificant, Enzo Ferrari placing greater value of a minor Formula Two race at Mons over the World Championship debut event. Following the Alfa Romeo domination at Silverstone, the Ferrari drivers of Luigi Villoresi, Alberto Ascari and Raymond Sommer were believed to be the only true rivals to the Alfa's strength. Aside from the works Ferrari's, Peter Whitehead would enter his privately owned Ferrari 125 to enter for the event. The Ferrari 125 was believed to be the only car capable of matching the Alfa's. It had been the strongest car throughout 1949 in the absence of the Alfa Romeo's following their withdrawal. However despite its speed it had yet to test itself against the mighty Alfa's. To make matters worse for Ferrari, the 125's lead designer, Gioacchino Colombo, had left the team to defect to Alfa Romeo upon their return in 1950. In response to this, the new lead designer for Ferrari, Aurelio Lampredi, had taken Colombo's promising your apprentice engineer Valerio Colotti for his own and had began designing a new Ferrari V12 engine to replace the current model of the 125.
 
{{Weather<!--
 
|fp1 = Sunny
 
|fp2 = Rain
 
|fp3 = Cloudy
 
|qualification = Partly Cloudy-->
 
|race = Partly Cloudy
 
}}
 
   
 
The other manufacturer to debut at Monaco was the Simca-Gordini outfit. The minor French manufacturer was expected to be a solid midfield team with Maurice Trintignant, André Simon and Robert Manzon racing at their helm. Simon, however would cancel his entry prior to the beginning of the event. After a disappointing run in Silverstone, the major French manufacturer had scaled back its works team to fielding only Yves-Giraud Cabantous, although Philippe Étancelin, Louis Rosier, Pierre Levegh, Charles Pozzi and Johnny Claes would continue to compete in the modern T26C's as privateer racers.
 
The other manufacturer to debut at Monaco was the Simca-Gordini outfit. The minor French manufacturer was expected to be a solid midfield team with Maurice Trintignant, André Simon and Robert Manzon racing at their helm. Simon, however would cancel his entry prior to the beginning of the event. After a disappointing run in Silverstone, the major French manufacturer had scaled back its works team to fielding only Yves-Giraud Cabantous, although Philippe Étancelin, Louis Rosier, Pierre Levegh, Charles Pozzi and Johnny Claes would continue to compete in the modern T26C's as privateer racers.
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Louis Chiron and Franco Rol continued as the works Maserati drivers whilst privateer team, Scuderia Achille Varzi made their debut with Maserati machinery. The Argentine run outfit, named in tribute of the great Achille Varzi, had been funded by the Automobil Club of Argentina and had allowed Juan Manuel Fangio to find success the previoys tyear. The youthful Argentine, José Froilán González, had joined the team as successor to Fangio's whilst alongside him was another great Argentine veteran, Alfredo Piàn. The Enrico Platé squad continued with Prince Bira and Baron de Graffenried as their drivers, whilst Clemente Biondetti was also racing a Maserati 4CLT, albeit the car had been modified by his team, Scuderia Milano.
 
Louis Chiron and Franco Rol continued as the works Maserati drivers whilst privateer team, Scuderia Achille Varzi made their debut with Maserati machinery. The Argentine run outfit, named in tribute of the great Achille Varzi, had been funded by the Automobil Club of Argentina and had allowed Juan Manuel Fangio to find success the previoys tyear. The youthful Argentine, José Froilán González, had joined the team as successor to Fangio's whilst alongside him was another great Argentine veteran, Alfredo Piàn. The Enrico Platé squad continued with Prince Bira and Baron de Graffenried as their drivers, whilst Clemente Biondetti was also racing a Maserati 4CLT, albeit the car had been modified by his team, Scuderia Milano.
   
Bob Gerard and Cuth Harrison would also participate as minor privateers, the duo competing in old A and B Type ERA machinery. Notably making his grand prix debut was American, Harry Schell. Schell would notably debut with a Cooper car designed for Formula Two and Formula Three racing, the small nimble Cooper was powered by a JAP motorcycle engine. It was also notably the first car in Formula One in which the engine manufacturer and chassis design had been built independently from one another.
+
Bob Gerard and Cuth Harrison would also participate as minor privateers, the duo competing in old A and B Type ERA machinery. Notably making his grand prix debut was American, Harry Schell. Schell would notably debut with a Cooper car designed for Formula Two and Formula Three racing, the small nimble Cooper was powered by a JAP motorcycle engine. It was also notably the first car in Formula One in which the engine manufacturer and chassis design had been built independently from one another.
   
 
==Entry list==
 
==Entry list==
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|4CLT/48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|4CLT/48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|4CLT/48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|4CLT/48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Cooper T12|T12]]
 
| [[Cooper T12|T12]]
 
| {{JAP-ENG}}
 
| {{JAP-ENG}}
| 1.1 [[V2]]
+
| 1.1 V2
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
| 15C 1.4 [[L4]]s
+
| 15C 1.4 L4s
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
| 15C 1.4 [[L4]]s
+
| 15C 1.4 L4s
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| [[Talbot-Lago T26C|T26C]]
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
 
| {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
| 23CV 4.5 [[L6]]
+
| 23CV 4.5 L6
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[ERA B|B]]
 
| [[ERA B|B]]
 
| {{ERA-CON}}
 
| {{ERA-CON}}
| 1.5 [[L6]]s
+
| 1.5 L6s
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[ERA A|A]]
 
| [[ERA A|A]]
 
| {{ERA-CON}}
 
| {{ERA-CON}}
| 1.5 [[L6]]s
+
| 1.5 L6s
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
| 125 F1 1.5 [[V12]]s
+
| 125 F1 1.5 V12s
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
| {{Dunlop}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| 159 LBC 1.5 [[L8]]s
+
| 159 LBC 1.5 L8s
 
|  {{Pirelli}}
 
|  {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| 159 LBC 1.5 [[L8]]s
+
| 159 LBC 1.5 L8s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
 
| 36
 
| 36
| {{ITA}} [[Luigi Fagioli]]
+
|  {{ITA}} [[Luigi Fagioli]]
 
| {{ITA}} [[Alfa Romeo|Alfa Romeo SpA]]
 
| {{ITA}} [[Alfa Romeo|Alfa Romeo SpA]]
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
 
| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| [[Alfa Romeo 158|158]]
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
 
| {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
| 159 LBC 1.5 [[L8]]s
+
| 159 LBC 1.5 L8s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
| 125 F1 1.5 [[V12]]s
+
| 125 F1 1.5 V12s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
| 125 F1 1.5 [[V12]]s
+
| 125 F1 1.5 V12s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| [[Ferrari 125|125]]
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
 
| {{Ferrari-CON}}
| 125 F1 1.5 [[V12]]s
+
| 125 F1 1.5 V12s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/50|50]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/50|50]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| [[Maserati 4CLT/48|48]]
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
 
| {{Maserati-CON}}
| 4CL 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 4CL 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
| {{Pirelli}}
 
|-
 
|-
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| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| [[Simca-Gordini T15|T15]]
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
 
| {{Simca-Gordini}}
| 15C 1.5 [[L4]]s
+
| 15C 1.5 L4s
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
| {{Englebert}}
 
|-
 
|-
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===Qualifying Results===
 
===Qualifying Results===
{| class="wikitable" style="font-size:90%"
+
{| class="wikitable" style="width:100%; font-size:90%"
 
!Pos!!No.!!Driver!!Constructor!!Time!!Gap!!{{abbr|%|Percentage of pole time}}!!{{abbr|Avg Speed|in km/h}}
 
!Pos!!No.!!Driver!!Constructor!!Time!!Gap!!{{abbr|%|Percentage of pole time}}!!{{abbr|Avg Speed|in km/h}}
 
|-
 
|-
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! Pts
 
! Pts
 
|-
 
|-
! 1
+
| 1
 
| 34
 
| 34
| {{ARG}} [[Juan Manuel Fangio]]
+
| [[Juan Manuel Fangio]]
| {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
| [[Alfa Romeo]]
 
| 100
 
| 100
 
| 3:13:18.7
 
| 3:13:18.7
 
| 98.701
 
| 98.701
 
| 1
 
| 1
! 9
+
| 9
 
|-
 
|-
! 2
+
| 2
 
| 40
 
| 40
| {{ITA}} [[Alberto Ascari]]
+
| [[Alberto Ascari]]
| {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
+
| [[Ferrari]]
 
| 99
 
| 99
 
| + 1 lap
 
| + 1 lap
 
| 97.251
 
| 97.251
 
| 7
 
| 7
! 6
+
| 6
 
|-
 
|-
! 3
+
| 3
 
| 48
 
| 48
| {{MON}} [[Louis Chiron]]
+
| [[Louis Chiron]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
| 98
 
| 98
 
| + 2 laps
 
| + 2 laps
 
| 96.191
 
| 96.191
 
| 8
 
| 8
! 4
+
| 4
 
|-
 
|-
! 4
+
| 4
 
| 42
 
| 42
| {{FRA}} [[Raymond Sommer]]
+
| [[Raymond Sommer]]
| {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
+
| [[Ferrari]]
 
| 97
 
| 97
 
| + 3 laps
 
| + 3 laps
 
| 95.451
 
| 95.451
 
| 9
 
| 9
! 3
+
| 3
 
|-
 
|-
! 5
+
| 5
 
| 50
 
| 50
| {{THA}} [[Prince Bira]]
+
| [[Prince Bira]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
| 95
 
| 95
 
| + 5 laps
 
| + 5 laps
 
| 93.363
 
| 93.363
 
| 15
 
| 15
! 2
+
| 2
 
|-
 
|-
! 6
+
| 6
 
| 26
 
| 26
| {{GBR}} [[Bob Gerard]]
+
| [[Bob Gerard]]
| {{GBR}} {{ERA-CON}}
+
| [[ERA]]
 
| 94
 
| 94
 
| + 6 laps
 
| + 6 laps
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! 7
+
| 7
 
| 6
 
| 6
| {{BEL}} [[Johnny Claes]]
+
| [[Johnny Claes]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
| 94
 
| 94
 
| + 6 laps
 
| + 6 laps
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 38
 
| 38
| {{ITA}} [[Luigi Villoresi]]
+
| [[Luigi Villoresi]]
| {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
+
| [[Ferrari]]
 
| 63
 
| 63
 
| Axle
 
| Axle
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 14
 
| 14
| {{FRA}} [[Philippe Étancelin]]
+
| [[Philippe Étancelin]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
| 38
 
| 38
 
| Oil leak
 
| Oil leak
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 2
 
| 2
| {{ARG}} [[José Froilán González]]
+
| [[José Froilán González]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
| 1
 
| 1
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 32
 
| 32
| {{ITA}} [[Giuseppe Farina]]
+
| [[Giuseppe Farina]]
| {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
| [[Alfa Romeo]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 36
 
| 36
| {{ITA}} [[Luigi Fagioli]]
+
| [[Luigi Fagioli]]
| {{ITA}} {{Alfa Romeo-CON}}
+
| [[Alfa Romeo]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 16
 
| 16
| {{FRA}} [[Louis Rosier]]
+
| [[Louis Rosier]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 10
 
| 10
| {{FRA}} [[Robert Manzon]]
+
| [[Robert Manzon]]
| {{FRA}} {{Simca-Gordini}}
+
| [[Simca-Gordini]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 52
 
| 52
| {{SUI}} [[Emmanuel de Graffenried]]
+
| [[Emmanuel de Graffenried]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 12
 
| 12
| {{FRA}} [[Maurice Trintignant]]
+
| [[Maurice Trintignant]]
| {{FRA}} {{Simca-Gordini}}
+
| [[Simca-Gordini]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
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|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 24
 
| 24
| {{GBR}} [[Cuth Harrison]]
+
| [[Cuth Harrison]]
| {{GBR}} {{ERA-CON}}
+
| [[ERA]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
Line 580: Line 580:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 44
 
| 44
| {{ITA}} [[Franco Rol]]
+
| [[Franco Rol]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
Line 590: Line 590:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! Ret
+
| Ret
 
| 8
 
| 8
| {{USA}} [[Harry Schell]]
+
| [[Harry Schell]]
| {{GBR}} {{Cooper-JAP}}
+
| [[Cooper]]-[[JAP]]
 
| 0
 
| 0
 
| Collision
 
| Collision
Line 600: Line 600:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNS
+
| DNS
 
| 4
 
| 4
| {{ARG}} [[Alfredo Pián]]
+
| [[Alfredo Pián]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Accident
 
| Accident
Line 610: Line 610:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNS
+
| DNS
 
| 28
 
| 28
| {{GBR}} [[Peter Whitehead]]
+
| [[Peter Whitehead]]
| {{ITA}} {{Ferrari-CON}}
+
| [[Ferrari]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Engine
 
| Engine
Line 620: Line 620:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNP
+
| DNP
 
| 18
 
| 18
| {{FRA}} [[Charles Pozzi]]
+
| [[Charles Pozzi]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Not present
 
| Not present
Line 630: Line 630:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNP
+
| DNP
 
| 20
 
| 20
| {{FRA}} [[Yves Giraud-Cabantous]]
+
| [[Yves Giraud-Cabantous]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Not present
 
| Not present
Line 640: Line 640:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNP
+
| DNP
 
| 22
 
| 22
| {{FRA}} [[Pierre Levegh]]
+
| [[Pierre Levegh]]
| {{FRA}} {{Talbot-Lago-CON}}
+
| [[Talbot-Lago]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Not Present
 
| Not Present
Line 650: Line 650:
 
|
 
|
 
|-
 
|-
! DNP
+
| DNP
 
| 46
 
| 46
| {{ITA}} [[Clemente Biondetti]]
+
| [[Clemente Biondetti]]
| {{ITA}} {{Maserati-CON}}
+
| [[Maserati]]
 
|
 
|
 
| Car unavailable
 
| Car unavailable
Line 745: Line 745:
 
|-
 
|-
 
| 2
 
| 2
| {{ARG}} [[Juan Manuel Fangio]]
+
| [[Juan Manuel Fangio]]
 
| 9
 
| 9
 
|-
 
|-
Line 784: Line 784:
 
*[[Juan Manuel Fangio]]'s first [[Pole Position|pole position]], [[victory]], [[fastest lap]], [[double]], [[hat-trick]] and [[Grand Chelem]].
 
*[[Juan Manuel Fangio]]'s first [[Pole Position|pole position]], [[victory]], [[fastest lap]], [[double]], [[hat-trick]] and [[Grand Chelem]].
 
*First Formula One Grand Chelem.
 
*First Formula One Grand Chelem.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Alberto Ascari]]:''' The 32-year-old Italian racer, Alberto Ascari, son of the famous 1920's race driver, [[Antonio Ascari]], made his Grand Prix entry into racing in 1940. However the Second World War prevented him from truly getting his career underway until 1947. Like his father before him, Ascari proved incredibly fast and he began producing impressive results in his private Maserati. His father, before his death in 1925 had befriended racer turned team manager, [[Enzo Ferrari]], who had began to follow the son of his late friend's career develop with great interest. In 1949, Enzo Ferrari signed the younger Ascari to his own team, Scuderia Ferrari. During 1949, Ascari won four Formula One races, more than any other Ferrari driver. Ascari continued with Ferrari for 1950, and was considered to be one of the best up and coming drivers of the new generation.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Alberto Ascari:''' The 32-year-old Italian racer, Alberto Ascari, son of the famous 1920's race driver, Antonio Ascari, made his Grand Prix entry into racing in 1940. However the Second World War prevented him from truly getting his career underway until 1947. Like his father before him, Ascari proved incredibly fast and he began producing impressive results in his private Maserati. His father, before his death in 1925 had befriended racer turned team manager, Enzo Ferrari, who had began to follow the son of his late friend's career develop with great interest. In 1949, Enzo Ferrari signed the younger Ascari to his own team, Scuderia Ferrari. During 1949, Ascari won four Formula One races, more than any other Ferrari driver. Ascari continued with Ferrari for 1950, and was considered to be one of the best up and coming drivers of the new generation.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[José Froilán González]]:''' The 28-year-old Argentine racer, González, was the most junior driver to enter the Monaco Grand Prix. His racing career had began in 1946 where he had began to quickly impress in local Argentine categories. In fact, his career rise mirrored the rise of Argentina's top driver, Juan Manuel Fangio, a man González idolised and revered. González impressed the international scene when he fought amongst the best international drivers when they came to race at Pelarmo in Buenos Aires. Subsequently, he bought a Maserati 4CL off Giuseppe Farina and travelled to Europe, following his idol, Juan Manuel Fangio. When Fangio left Scuderia Achille Varzi at the beginning of 1950, a team funded by the Automobile Club of Argentina, Fangio recommended the fast but inexperienced González to take his place.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - José Froilán González:''' The 28-year-old Argentine racer, González, was the most junior driver to enter the Monaco Grand Prix. His racing career had began in 1946 where he had began to quickly impress in local Argentine categories. In fact, his career rise mirrored the rise of Argentina's top driver, Juan Manuel Fangio, a man González idolised and revered. González impressed the international scene when he fought amongst the best international drivers when they came to race at Pelarmo in Buenos Aires. Subsequently, he bought a Maserati 4CL off Giuseppe Farina and travelled to Europe, following his idol, Juan Manuel Fangio. When Fangio left Scuderia Achille Varzi at the beginning of 1950, a team funded by the Automobile Club of Argentina, Fangio recommended the fast but inexperienced González to take his place.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Robert Manzon]]:''' The 33-year-old French racer, Robert Manzon, had began his racing career in 1946. Throughout 1946 and 1947, he produced some decent results in the tail ender Cisitalia chassis. He proved a successful racer in the minor categories and was a solid runner in the midfield for grand prix racing. Amédée Gordini, the founder of Simca-Gordini, found him a staunch competitor to race against and for 1948 signed Manzon as apart of his race team. Simca-Gordini was an ambitious team but it lacked the resources to be a front runner, Manzon nonetheless remained faithful to his team.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Robert Manzon:''' The 33-year-old French racer, Robert Manzon, had began his racing career in 1946. Throughout 1946 and 1947, he produced some decent results in the tail ender Cisitalia chassis. He proved a successful racer in the minor categories and was a solid runner in the midfield for grand prix racing. Amédée Gordini, the founder of Simca-Gordini, found him a staunch competitor to race against and for 1948 signed Manzon as apart of his race team. Simca-Gordini was an ambitious team but it lacked the resources to be a front runner, Manzon nonetheless remained faithful to his team.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Franco Rol]]:''' The 42-year-old Franco Rol, like many of his time was a wealthy hobby racer who made it into the higher categories through virtue of his talent. Beginning his career in 1947, Rol joined the Simca-Gordini team in Formula Two for the 1948 season. A series of retirements plagued his career and in 1949 he returned as a privateer racer. For 1950, Rol would start his first serious venture into Grand Prix racing when he joined the works Maserati team.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Franco Rol:''' The 42-year-old Franco Rol, like many of his time was a wealthy hobby racer who made it into the higher categories through virtue of his talent. Beginning his career in 1947, Rol joined the Simca-Gordini team in Formula Two for the 1948 season. A series of retirements plagued his career and in 1949 he returned as a privateer racer. For 1950, Rol would start his first serious venture into Grand Prix racing when he joined the works Maserati team.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Harry Schell]]:''' Born to wealthy motorsport enthusiasts, 29-year-old Harry was the son of former American racer Laury Schell and wife Lucy, a keen motorsport follower who invested into major European teams such as Delahaye in the 1930s. A veteran of the Second World War, he had flown in the Finnish Air Force against the Soviet Union in the Winter War of 1939 and then served in the United States Tank Corps in World War Two. His motor racing career had began in 1940 whilst racing in the United States, notably participating in the 1940 [[Indianapolis 500]] with a Maserati. Following the conclusion of the war he returned to motor racing, he primarily raced casually in Formula Two or Formula Three, but proved a talented racer. For 1950, Schell decided to enter his Formula Two, Cooper-JAP, into the prestigious Monaco Grand Prix despite its serious power deficiency in comparison to the Formula One cars.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Harry Schell:''' Born to wealthy motorsport enthusiasts, 29-year-old Harry was the son of former American racer Laury Schell and wife Lucy, a keen motorsport follower who invested into major European teams such as Delahaye in the 1930s. A veteran of the Second World War, he had flown in the Finnish Air Force against the Soviet Union in the Winter War of 1939 and then served in the United States Tank Corps in World War Two. His motor racing career had began in 1940 whilst racing in the United States, notably participating in the 1940 Indianapolis 500 with a Maserati. Following the conclusion of the war he returned to motor racing, he primarily raced casually in Formula Two or Formula Three, but proved a talented racer. For 1950, Schell decided to enter his Formula Two, Cooper-JAP, into the prestigious Monaco Grand Prix despite its serious power deficiency in comparison to the Formula One cars.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Raymond Sommer]]:''' One of the most experienced racers in the field, Sommer was one of the few remaining major pre-war racing drivers. At 43, he was still young enough to have a career ahead of him. He was famous for primarily racing independently as a privateer racer, rather than remain devoted to a major team and attempt to gain success. His career began in 1932, the same year he had won the 1932 24 Hours of Le Mans, the following year he repeated the feat in his first drive for a works team, this being Alfa Romeo. Nonetheless, rather than stay as a works driver he returned as an independent racer. He gained a reputation as one of the best independent racers. During 1937 and 1938, he was known for regularly swapping between being a privateer and racing for Talbot and Scuderia Ferrari throughout the seasons. In 1938, he committed to one team for the first time when he raced a season for Alfa Romeo. Sommer led at every major race but his machinery always let him down. Following the war, Sommer returned as a privateer in Formula One and Formula Two. In 1948 he completed a full season with Ferrari before in 1949 he swapped to the works Talbot-Lago team. For 1950, Sommer has rejoined Ferrari for the World Championship.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Raymond Sommer:''' One of the most experienced racers in the field, Sommer was one of the few remaining major pre-war racing drivers. At 43, he was still young enough to have a career ahead of him. He was famous for primarily racing independently as a privateer racer, rather than remain devoted to a major team and attempt to gain success. His career began in 1932, the same year he had won the 1932 24 Hours of Le Mans, the following year he repeated the feat in his first drive for a works team, this being Alfa Romeo. Nonetheless, rather than stay as a works driver he returned as an independent racer. He gained a reputation as one of the best independent racers. During 1937 and 1938, he was known for regularly swapping between being a privateer and racing for Talbot and Scuderia Ferrari throughout the seasons. In 1938, he committed to one team for the first time when he raced a season for Alfa Romeo. Sommer led at every major race but his machinery always let him down. Following the war, Sommer returned as a privateer in Formula One and Formula Two. In 1948 he completed a full season with Ferrari before in 1949 he swapped to the works Talbot-Lago team. For 1950, Sommer has rejoined Ferrari for the World Championship.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Maurice Trintignant]]:''' 33-year-old Trintignant had began his racing career in 1938 racing private Bugatti's. He resumed his career in 1947 when he joined the newly founded Simca-Gordini racing squad. He was known fondly in the Grand Prix scene as the 'rat dropping's man' after he retired from a race when his car became clogged with rat droppings. At the [[1948 Swiss Grand Prix]], Trintignant had a serious accident which left him in a coma for 6 weeks. Nonetheless, he returned to racing and the Simca-Gordini team for 1949.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Maurice Trintignant:''' 33-year-old Trintignant had began his racing career in 1938 racing private Bugatti's. He resumed his career in 1947 when he joined the newly founded Simca-Gordini racing squad. He was known fondly in the Grand Prix scene as the 'rat dropping's man' after he retired from a race when his car became clogged with rat droppings. At the 1948 Swiss Grand Prix, Trintignant had a serious accident which left him in a coma for 6 weeks. Nonetheless, he returned to racing and the Simca-Gordini team for 1949.
*'''First Entry & Race - [[Luigi Villoresi]]:''' The 41-year-old Villoresi began his motor racing career in 1933, but it was not until 1936 when he joined the Scuderia Ambrosiana team, racing private Maserati's that his career began to truly take off. After winning a series of minor Grands Prix, Villoresi joined the works Maserati team in 1938. He was regularly seen competing in Grands Prix alongside his younger brother, Emilio, but Emilio was killed in 1938 whilst testing for Alfa Romeo. Following the conclusion of the war, Villoresi returned to his old team, Scuderia Ambrosiana, where between 1946 and 1948 he was a regular race winner. His recent success meant that in 1949, Enzo Ferrari signed him as lead driver for his Scuderia Ferrari team. 1949 was another successful year, yielding a number of Grand Prix victories.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Luigi Villoresi''': The 41-year-old Villoresi began his motor racing career in 1933, but it was not until 1936 when he joined the Scuderia Ambrosiana team, racing private Maserati's that his career began to truly take off. After winning a series of minor Grands Prix, Villoresi joined the works Maserati team in 1938. He was regularly seen competing in Grands Prix alongside his younger brother, Emilio, but Emilio was killed in 1938 whilst testing for Alfa Romeo. Following the conclusion of the war, Villoresi returned to his old team, Scuderia Ambrosiana, where between 1946 and 1948 he was a regular race winner. His recent success meant that in 1949, Enzo Ferrari signed him as lead driver for his Scuderia Ferrari team. 1949 was another successful year, yielding a number of Grand Prix victories.
*'''First Entry & Race - {{Cooper-CON}}:''' Cooper Car Company, was only three years old in 1950, following its inception by Charles and John Cooper in 1947. In this period, the manufacturer had not planned to enter Formula One, its T12 chassis proved dominant in Formula Three, but it was not up to Formula One standard. The works team had not yet entered Formula One, and Harry Schell's decision to enter his T12 privately as a minor competitor did not see the accompany of the works team; however, nonetheless, Monaco 1950 saw the debut of Cooper cars in the Formula One field.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Cooper:''' Cooper Car Company, was only three years old in 1950, following its inception by Charles and John Cooper in 1947. In this period, the manufacturer had not planned to enter Formula One, its T12 chassis proved dominant in Formula Three, but it was not up to Formula One standard. The works team had not yet entered Formula One, and Harry Schell's decision to enter his T12 privately as a minor competitor did not see the accompany of the works team; however, nonetheless, Monaco 1950 saw the debut of Cooper cars in the Formula One field.
*'''First Entry & Race - {{Ferrari-CON}}:''' Although only operating as a manufacturer since 1947, Enzo Ferrari's team had been operating since 1929 where it proved to be the most successful team running Alfa Romeo chassis. In the late 1930s, Scuderia Ferrari had been one of the only teams capable of challenging the might of the German auto giants, {{Mercedes-Benz-CON}} and {{Auto Union-CON}}. Following the war, Enzo Ferrari finally decided to start building his own cars. Ferrari immediately proved to be one of the most impressive new stables, following Alfa Romeo's original withdrawal from racing in 1948, Ferrari had been the fastest cars throughout 1949. With the return of the dominant Alfa's in 1950, Ferrari was believed to be the only manufacturer capable of challenging the Alfa's.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Ferrari:''' Although only operating as a manufacturer since 1947, Enzo Ferrari's team had been operating since 1929 where it proved to be the most successful team running Alfa Romeo chassis. In the late 1930s, Scuderia Ferrari had been one of the only teams capable of challenging the might of the German auto giants, Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union. Following the war, Enzo Ferrari finally decided to start building his own cars. Ferrari immediately proved to be one of the most impressive new stables, following Alfa Romeo's original withdrawal from racing in 1948, Ferrari had been the fastest cars throughout 1949. With the return of the dominant Alfa's in 1950, Ferrari was believed to be the only manufacturer capable of challenging the Alfa's.
*'''First Entry & Race - {{Simca-Gordini-CON}}:''' Another new manufacturer formed following the conclusion of war. Simca-Gordini was formed in 1946 by Amédée Gordini; the name symbolised the relationship between Simca, the French division of automotive supergiant Fiat, and Gordini's own independent manufacturer. Nonetheless, the team ran on a tight budget, and was still behind France's top motor racing manufacturer, Talbot-Lago, in terms of pace. Nonetheless, the team and drivers were skilled and the cars ran successfully in the Formula Two division taking many victories.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - Simca-Gordini:''' Another new manufacturer formed following the conclusion of war. Simca-Gordini was formed in 1946 by Amédée Gordini; the name symbolised the relationship between Simca, the French division of automotive supergiant Fiat, and Gordini's own independent manufacturer. Nonetheless, the team ran on a tight budget, and was still behind France's top motor racing manufacturer, Talbot-Lago, in terms of pace. Nonetheless, the team and drivers were skilled and the cars ran successfully in the Formula Two division taking many victories.
*'''First Entry & Race - {{JAP-ENG}}:''' JAP standing for 'JA Prestwich Industries' was an engine manufacturer that supplied engines to the Cooper Formula Three teams. What is now common place in modern Formula One, the partnership of Cooper and JAP where the engine and chassis manufacturers were completely different was a novelty in 1950. The JAP engine in the Cooper T12 was a motorcycle engine, commonly used in motorcycle Grand Prix, but not in motor cars. It had success in Formula Three, but the engine power was believed to be nowhere near strong enough to compete with the powerful engines of Formula One.
+
*'''First Entry & Race - JAP:''' JAP standing for 'JA Prestwich Industries' was an engine manufacturer that supplied engines to the Cooper Formula Three teams. What is now common place in modern Formula One, the partnership of Cooper and JAP where the engine and chassis manufacturers were completely different was a novelty in 1950. The JAP engine in the Cooper T12 was a motorcycle engine, commonly used in motorcycle Grand Prix, but not in motor cars. It had success in Formula Three, but the engine power was believed to be nowhere near strong enough to compete with the powerful engines of Formula One.
*'''First Entry - [[Clemente Biondetti]]''': At 52 years old, Biondetti was one of the most senior racers on the grid. He had began his career way back in 1927. He distinguished himself well as a privateer racer. During the 1930s, he raced primarily for minor Maserati teams as well as a full season for the works Maserati in 1931. His career was littered with bad luck and retirements; however, in 1937, he joined the Scuderia Ferrari outfit and immediately hit success. From 1938 to 1939, he finally hit success taking a number of victories and podiums for the works Alfa Romeo team. However, the war cut short his career just as it was on the rise. This seemed to be the end of his career but he was offered to take part in a number of races for Enzo Ferrari's new Ferrari team in 1948, he impressed but his time was considered behind him. Nonetheless Biondetti since returned to racing, participating mainly as a privateer.
+
*'''First Entry - Clemente Biondetti''': At 52 years old, Biondetti was one of the most senior racers on the grid. He had began his career way back in 1927. He distinguished himself well as a privateer racer. During the 1930s, he raced primarily for minor Maserati teams as well as a full season for the works Maserati in 1931. His career was littered with bad luck and retirements; however, in 1937, he joined the Scuderia Ferrari outfit and immediately hit success. From 1938 to 1939, he finally hit success taking a number of victories and podiums for the works Alfa Romeo team. However, the war cut short his career just as it was on the rise. This seemed to be the end of his career but he was offered to take part in a number of races for Enzo Ferrari's new Ferrari team in 1948, he impressed but his time was considered behind him. Nonetheless Biondetti since returned to racing, participating mainly as a privateer.
*'''First Entry - [[Pierre Levegh]]:'''
+
*'''First Entry - Pierre Levegh:'''
*'''First Entry - [[Alfredo Piàn]]:'''
+
*'''First Entry - Alfredo Piàn:'''
*'''First Entry - [[Peter Whitehead]]:'''
+
*'''First Entry - Pierre Levegh:'''
  +
*'''First Entry - Peter Whitehead:'''
 
*'''Final Entry & Race - Alfredo Pián:'''
 
*'''Final Entry & Race - Alfredo Pián:'''
 
*'''Final Entry & Race - JAP:'''
 
*'''Final Entry & Race - JAP:'''
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